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Discussion Starter #1
The new Pro Power technology options seem a natural for camper builds, particularly the base 2.0 kW system designed for optional F-150 gas engines.

Road&Track report that the base 2.0 kW Pro Power system (unlike the hybrid F-150) use dual segregated alternators, and that the second alternator is 24V. I haven’t seen confirmation of the 24V or on size of batteries, but such a system from the factory sure would be nice for camper vans. I’m looking forward to the cost.



 

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Discussion Starter #3
Auto engineers don’t usually design things on a whim, so there are some clues I find interesting regarding the base system for gas engines.

Firstly, why go to 24V on one of the two segregated alternators? No doubt a 2,000-Watt inverter requires a lot of power, but even 3,000-Watt 12V inverters are common. We’d have to assume that keeping batteries separate was very important so the starting battery doesn’t end up dead accidentally. Also, by making the ProPower 24 Volts, not only does it reduce current in half (roughly from 200 to 100 Amps at rated 2,000-Watts), but also keeps DIY’ers from tinkering with systems trying to interconnect them.

Secondly, why use two additional “conventional” batteries instead of lithium? This ProPower system should operate similar to an RV house electrical system, so why not go with lithium batteries if it has its own dedicated alternator? Maybe cost? Less temperature sensitivity?

Thirdly, why not use 48V for second segregated electrical system considering 48V is a new standard? My only guess is that if Ford had already decided on using AGM batteries, that 4 X 12V batteries was more than they needed or could justify due to cost, weight, packaging, etc. For whatever reason, I expect Ford engineers avoided using lithium batteries in favor of conventional 12V batteries in series. My only explanation would be cold temperatures in winter since batteries are likely installed outside.
 

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Read about the thermal management systems automakers use with Li batteries, they are pretty complex, most ive read about are liquid heated/cooled.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Read about the thermal management systems automakers use with Li batteries, they are pretty complex, most ive read about are liquid heated/cooled.
The Ford F-150 hybrid battery is reportedly liquid cooled. I suppose it could be heated in winter the same way. I saw a disassembled hybrid battery pack from an older Ford car that was heated by cabin air; once car got up to temperature in winter a fan would blow warm air over battery. That can work for hybrids since engine can supply heat.

As I recall from a drawing, the small battery in hybrid RAM pickup is mounted inside cab behind back seat. I suppose it would warm up in time once cab heater is on.


If a ProMaster had one of the mild hybrid 48V eTorque engines (3.6 or 2.0), it seems to me that RAM could easily upgrade the electrical system similar to the Ford ProPower.

At present a RAM could be limited to roughly 1/3 the maximum capacity of a Ford based on specs we’ve seen, but that’s not all bad. The RAM puts out at least 12 kW versus Ford’s 35 kW, and the RAM battery is 0.43 kWh versus Ford’s 1.5 kWh, so “in theory” at least a 2 kW electrical system should be possible, maybe a lot more.
 
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