Ram Promaster Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm at the point in my build where I'm about to build/install several floor-to-ceiling walls/partitions/cabinets. Two questions:

1. I get how to scribe the walls, but with the pencil/circular disk method you're left with a gap when you get to abrupt angles/changes from vertical to horizontal (if that makes sense). I can piece together a template with cardboard, but if anyone has some tips here on scribing it would be greatly appreciated. Especially interested in how to scribe complex shapes without having any sort of 'gap'.

2. Anything special to know about installing floor to ceiling walls/partitions/cabinets? My plan is to cut the correct height and then scribe the wall side, cut and install. Is there a concern for squeaks/noise here (seems as though it would be hard to get all the surfaces to screw together tightly)? How DO I best connect these pieces of ply to the walls/ceiling/floors? My plan was pocket joinery where I can, and otherwise L brackets.

Any input on these topics would be much appreciated, nervous about this step. Thanks.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,837 Posts
He is not super good but has great hanging moss on his chin. I would attach blocks to the van w/bolts/rivnuts and screw to them. Metal L brackets are often used too.
[ame]https://www.amazon.com/Bracket-Stainless-Corner-Brackets-Screws-40/dp/B0753C9CLM/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1520341367&sr=8-4&keywords=L+brackets[/ame]
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,650 Posts
Keep in mind if you are building a floor to ceiling cabinet it’s best to scribe the sides (either on cheap ply, cardboard or the real thing depending on your skill level) then cut the sides in your shop and make up the face, screw the face on with pocket screws but don’t glue it. Then disassemble it (it won’t fit in the van assembled unless it’s a very shallow cabinet) and put it together in place inside the van (don’t forget to glue the face besides using the pocket screws. I never build van cabinets with backs but I sometimes will build in back rails out of scrap ¾" ply 4" to 6" wide and attach them at the top, middle and bottom with pocket screws and glue then screw or bolt the cabinet in that way. I also use a combo of "L" brackets and rails, if necessary. It’s far easier to fit a piece or two of ¼" or ⅜" plywood in later to act as a back for the cabinet.

I tend to build and instal my cabinets first then insulate and trim the walls making it even easier but others would/will strenuously disagree with this approach so be warned in advance and do what you find to be the easiest or most convent way ;)
 

·
Registered
2014-159 HR in CT
Joined
·
3,689 Posts
...Is there a concern for squeaks/noise here (seems as though it would be hard to get all the surfaces to screw together tightly)?
In a number of places where I was concerned about squeaks from two pieces of wood rubbing or moving, I glued a piece of felt between the pieces to act as a buffer/anti-squeak layer.... it has worked well for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Keep in mind if you are building a floor to ceiling cabinet it?s best to scribe the sides (either on cheap ply, cardboard or the real thing depending on your skill level) then cut the sides in your shop and make up the face, screw the face on with pocket screws but don?t glue it. Then disassemble it (it won?t fit in the van assembled unless it?s a very shallow cabinet) and put it together in place inside the van (don?t forget to glue the face besides using the pocket screws. I never build van cabinets with backs but I sometimes will build in back rails out of scrap ¾" ply 4" to 6" wide and attach them at the top, middle and bottom with pocket screws and glue then screw or bolt the cabinet in that way. I also use a combo of "L" brackets and rails, if necessary. It?s far easier to fit a piece or two of ¼" or ?" plywood in later to act as a back for the cabinet.

I tend to build and instal my cabinets first then insulate and trim the walls making it even easier but others would/will strenuously disagree with this approach so be warned in advance and do what you find to be the easiest or most convent way /forum/images/PromasterForum_2014/smilies/tango_face_wink.png
Thanks. I already have wooden supports to go into on the back walls, ceiling, and floor. Can you explain what you mean by “L brackets and rails when necessary”?

I’ve attached a photo of what I’d like to do. Just a wall the size of these shower ones. I have a ceiling, rear structural paneling, and framing down to the floor. Guess I just use L brackets and pocket holes to screw all surfaces? Seems like if it’s off at all in height (too short) it will be noticeable, and if it’s just right it will be hard to fit without damaging the ceiling? Perhaps I’m overthinking.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
...
with the pencil/circular disk method you're left with a gap when you get to abrupt angles/changes from vertical to horizontal (if that makes sense). ... Especially interested in how to scribe complex shapes without having any sort of 'gap'.
....
Some call it "Flag and Tick Sticks". It is a method that old ship builders use and can be as precise as you want to take the time to make it.
Google it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dave06

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,837 Posts
A fellow builder and friend would fit up something like this and it would come out very nice. He would invariably say “Look at that it fits perfectly............ oh what the **** let's use it anyway!” It never failed to make me laugh!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,650 Posts
Thanks. I already have wooden supports to go into on the back walls, ceiling, and floor. Can you explain what you mean by “L brackets and rails when necessary”?

I’ve attached a photo of what I’d like to do. Just a wall the size of these shower ones. I have a ceiling, rear structural paneling, and framing down to the floor. Guess I just use L brackets and pocket holes to screw all surfaces? Seems like if it’s off at all in height (too short) it will be noticeable, and if it’s just right it will be hard to fit without damaging the ceiling? Perhaps I’m overthinking.
L brackets are steel strips bent to a 90º angle you use to join 2 pieces of material together with to form a right angle. Something like this
rails are just anything you can attach the cabinet too. Rails can be the steel body of the van or wood strip screwed to the back of the cabinet.

Yes, you need to get the height very close to look good or use some trim afterward. This is one (of many) reason I prefer to put my cabinets in first and then finish around them in a van.

You're not overthinking you just need to take your time and work slowly - measure 3 times, cut once!
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top