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I finally finished the floor install on my 136" HR and wanted to record it for those who might be looking for ideas. It is comprised of Marmoleum, 3/4 lap-jointed plywood, 1" polyiso, a radiant heat element, PEX runs, and a battery interconnect wire. Here are some pictures:
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Discussion Starter #2
It started with three sheets of 3/4" plywood, lap-jointed by 1.25" across the van twice, making it a single, monolithic piece. The final product was heavy, but I would do it this way again. Here it is upside down on my workbench. You can see the radiant heat pad taped in place and the white pex run in front of the wheel wells.

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Here is a close-up of the lap joint. You can see the blue Marmoleum has been applied (on bottom, b/c it's upside down).

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The holes for the PEX are two different diameters. The larger diameter accommodates the clamp ring on the pex. The smaller diameter fits the tubing.
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The next step was to install 1" (5/4) Poplar boards at the entrances. The idea here was: (i) give the floor strength where people and things enter, and (ii) provide something strong to which the trim pieces will attach.
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Then comes the 1" insulation. (The inspector approves.)

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Here, you can see the channel where the PEX runs. I included two plywood support pieces, since I'll be jumping out of bed at this location and wanted to support the insulation to prevent collapse over time.
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Discussion Starter #4
I forgot to mention: I "glued" the foam board down with some leftover primer paint. It only needed to hold long enough to move the thing into the van. It did very well and was cost effective.

Two buddies helped me move it from the workbench into the van. If doing a 159", I'd recommend four people. For the 136", three was sufficient. Here it is after initial install:
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You can see the battery interconnect wire and the power wires for the radiant floor pad sticking up through a hold on the right, rear side here:

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Discussion Starter #5
After install of the trim pieces, there is about 1/4" space between the rear door hardware and the floor. Same for the sliders.

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Discussion Starter #6
Finally, here are a few pictures of the slider trim pieces and the PEX. The trim pieces are 3/4" maple, finished with spar varnish:

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Driver side feed from future water heater & pump:

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Passenger side source for sink / outdoor shower attachment:

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Thanks for looking!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you. A note about the buried PEX. It is unserviceable in the event of failure, as is the battery interconnect wire. This occurred to me in the design phase, which I mention elsewhere. I assessed the risk to be low based on experience — no issues with PEX eight years after 35’ bus conversion, even when lines froze. The contingency plan if failure occurs is to run new lines “above ground,” leaving the old ones as artifacts to improper risk assessment. This is “one way to do it” and something future floor installers will need to think critically about before beginning.
 

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I have thousands of feet of PEX in my house and barn. It does not fail if you don’t put screws through the floor or some such stupid act. All the house wiring in the many houses I have built or worked on have not failed either. Its the terminations that fail. You will be fine!
 

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Very nice work. I was looking into what I can do for the edge along side the back doors and side slide door for my floor. This trim looks nice but I might do something that can take a beating like diamond plate.
 

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Very nice work. I was looking into what I can do for the edge along side the back doors and side slide door for my floor. This trim looks nice but I might do something that can take a beating like diamond plate.
I agree beautiful work here Vandit, one of the nicest floors I have seen on here.



@librab103 I used aluminum angle 2” x 2” IIRC & it fit perfectly with my 1” XPS & 3/4 BB plywood floor.

photo;
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Discussion Starter #15
... I might do something that can take a beating like diamond plate.
This trim is maple, which is pretty resilient for camper use. But I know it’s going to get chewed up, so I did not glue it. Five screws and it comes off for refinishing or replacement. For me, the softer look of wood is what I was after. I’m hoping it ties in with the Baltic Birch I’ll be using throughout.

You might consider angle stock like RV8R did, if you need something more rugged. I like the look of aluminum. You might consider easing the sharp edge. Alternatively, angle iron is already rounded a bit on that outer 90 and is more resilient than aluminum. I’ve previously used angle iron in another conversion and was happy with it. It had the added benefit of clamping down some carpet (which was supposed to be temporary, but everything temporary in that build somehow became permanent — like taxes). Depending on plywood thickness, you could consider running shallow rabbet with a router so the iron sits flush to the finished floor. This is just for aesthetics, though, the 1/8” lip never bothered me.

I prefer the angle stock, whether aluminum or iron, over a flat strap or bar stock across the end. If you go with flat diamond plate, I think thicker material would look and function best.

Would love to see pics of your solution here when installed.
 

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This trim is maple, which is pretty resilient for camper use. But I know it’s going to get chewed up, so I did not glue it. Five screws and it comes off for refinishing or replacement. For me, the softer look of wood is what I was after. I’m hoping it ties in with the Baltic Birch I’ll be using throughout.

You might consider angle stock like RV8R did, if you need something more rugged. I like the look of aluminum. You might consider easing the sharp edge. Alternatively, angle iron is already rounded a bit on that outer 90 and is more resilient than aluminum. I’ve previously used angle iron in another conversion and was happy with it. It had the added benefit of clamping down some carpet (which was supposed to be temporary, but everything temporary in that build somehow became permanent — like taxes). Depending on plywood thickness, you could consider running shallow rabbet with a router so the iron sits flush to the finished floor. This is just for aesthetics, though, the 1/8” lip never bothered me.

I prefer the angle stock, whether aluminum or iron, over a flat strap or bar stock across the end. If you go with flat diamond plate, I think thicker material would look and function best.

Would love to see pics of your solution here when installed.
@Vandit

I like the work “floor” that you built, but more importantly I like that you explained your reasoning & forethought for things like chewed up trim or abandoning unserviceable pex in the unlikely even of a leak. But mostly I like your willingness to describe your design & build thought process (Very helpful for other DIY to read & help).

I used lots of aluminum angle for my build. I like working with aluminum & it can be “cut” on my table saw with a skillsaw blade “diablo carbine tip framing demo blade”
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I used aluminum @ my slider door as well (rubber backed mat just sits on my finished 3/4” BB 5x10 plywood). With the Costco mat the top of the mat & top of the aluminum is pretty much flush. This mat stays in place & I can take it out in seconds to clean it or vacumm (Costco $12). Any floor or edge strip will get beat up. If I care, I can simply ”refinish“ my BB floor by unscrewing the aluminum edge, lightly sand the floor finish & reapply finishing product. Once off the floor I can sand & polish my aluminum if desired. I still need to apply a trim cover “base” to the kitchen cabinet to the left of the aluminum trim to cover the cabinet/floor/xps rigid insulation edge. 90% done & only 90% to go on my build.
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Hi,
Very nice workmanship.

We have a similar PEX run through our floor, and have found it to be the most troublesome part of our water system to keep from freezing when using the van in cold temps. We finally added a quick and easy way to blow this underfloor line out if we are going to be away from the van for a few hours. If you plan to use the van in cold temps, I'd try to have a quick and easy way to drain or blowout the PEX line. A light electric heater line along the PEX would be another alternative. But, if you don't plan to camp in cold areas, not a problem.

Gary
 

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Thanks @RV8R. I have benefitted greatly from the advice and archives here, so I'm happy to share any of my results - whether success or failure - with current and future builders. What I really enjoy is seeing how each person's personality speaks through his or her build. We all start with the same van, and there are no standard plans, so each build captures something of the builder along the way.
 

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Hi,
Very nice workmanship.

We have a similar PEX run through our floor, and have found it to be the most troublesome part of our water system to keep from freezing when using the van in cold temps. We finally added a quick and easy way to blow this underfloor line out if we are going to be away from the van for a few hours. If you plan to use the van in cold temps, I'd try to have a quick and easy way to drain or blowout the PEX line.
Thanks Gary. That's helpful. A heat line makes sense, but I didn't think of that, and it's too late now.

Could you describe or post a picture of your solution? Apologies if you've already done that elsewhere and I missed it.

I don't plan to be in freezing weather, but I don't want to rule it out. So, I will add in a system like yours. A few valves and some compressed air, I assume?
 

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Thanks @RV8R. What I really enjoy is seeing how each person's personality speaks through his or her build. We all start with the same van, and there are no standard plans, so each build captures something of the builder along the way.
It’s the grownups' pinewood derby.
 
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