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That's not really how it works. Your ability to power the oven is based on: Size of the inverter. A 2000W inverter maybe marginal for an 1800W oven (efficiency losses, fudged specifications, duty cycle limits, etc). Then it is limited by the ability of your batteries to deliver 160 Amps. That is a function of the size and chemistry of your batteries.

Then you get to the question of how much solar do you need to recharge your batteries on a typical day. To answer that, you need to know how much power you consume each day.
 

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The reality is that 1800W is nearly double what the vast majority of us can handle—we choose slow microwaves for a reason. If this toaster is a necessity, you will pay dearly for the privilege. Only a small handful of the folks here could run that.
 

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Anything “heat” will require a rocking 12v system to have any functional use (unless you are on the bleeding edge of tech & willing to spend lots on it).

An unpopular alternative is to carry a small portable quiet gas generator that will provide you with 1800W or more.

Our initial design with our gasoline 2018 PM build was 100% electrical for everything camping. After floundering around (12v, gasoline, diesel, propane). After screwing around with several ideas, we finally settled on propane for “heat” & settled on 12v where efficient (roof fan, water pump, fridge, charge station for devices, led lights, operational voltage for furnace & fan). We have 120v & a 30amp shore power external plug & 6 duplex plugs that we rarely use.
 

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I have a 2000W inverter and 200ah of lithium batteries and I'm able to run my 1600W convection microwave and 1800W kettle without a problem (not at the same time of course). There's nothing complicated or bleeding edge about my system and the cost was not that much.
 

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I have a 2000W inverter and 200ah of lithium batteries and I'm able to run my 1600W convection microwave and 1800W kettle without a problem (not at the same time of course). There's nothing complicated or bleeding edge about my system and the cost was not that much.
200 Ah lithium probably cost more than most of paid for our entire electrical systems.
 

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I can run a toaster oven if I was so inclined (600AH battery, 3000 VA inverter) but I would never choose to do so. Unless you are really cooking something that cooks very quickly it is not an efficient use of power. Unless you really like something that must be oven baked, or it is something that just needs a little time in the oven, I would really not suggest it.

The fact that you are asking about solar, suggests to me you won't have shore power. So there are numerous ways to answer the question.
1. If you want to run it without using any battery power, then about 2000W of solar should power the oven when the sun is shining, you can't fit that on a promaster, so you would need a trailer or keep them inside and bring them out when you park and set them up. Takes up a lot of space inside and requires a large footprint when you park. Not reasonable, so lets examine a battery.
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2. Assuming you have adequate battery reserve, you can power the oven for 30 minutes and use about 900Watt hours of power (about 80 amp hours of 12V DC due to inverter losses). To generate that in the summer in most locations in the US you will need about 200 watts of solar panels, in the winter you might need 400-500 watts of panels. In the summer that oven will heat up your interior, in the winter it takes a lot of solar to generate that much power.

We are talking 200-500 watts of solar panels to run an 1800 W oven for 30 minutes. Even at half that (15 minutes), 100-250 watts of solar just to run a toaster oven. We haven't even considered what else you might want to run, a fridge, freezer, vent fan, heater, chargers, TV, computer, water pump?

As you can see, it just doesn't make sense to try and run a toaster oven with any degree of regularity or for any amount of time on solar power. Its just too big of a load and takes a long time to cook. People do run microwaves, but these are typically smaller (1100W or less) and run for a shorter period of time (5 minutes or less for many things). I have a microwave and it is my primary method of heating food. The key is that it just doesn't run long enough to make a bit of difference in my power use. An oven is different, higher load, longer times.

I have a butane stove I also carry if I get the urge to cook. If I wanted to oven cook something I would consider a dutch oven, stove top oven(like other suggest), or something along those lines before I would try a toaster oven (and my batteries are huge compared to most) But even large batteries are just a storage system, you still have to be able to refuel and it doesn't make sense to devote such a large part of a solar system to running an oven that will make the van hot inside in the summer and use up limited solar resource in the winter.

There is a lot of experience here and everyone is telling you the same thing. BUT if you decide to do it, please report back and let us know how it works. You can add to the collective experience of the group.
 

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Perhaps, but y'all made it sound like it was the most complicated and expensive thing in the world. If Travelwise wants to spend a few K on his system, it's not a big deal.
My system is so simple and basic, it's about 1 step above a Baghdad battery. So I can't offer the op any useful advice in how to run an 1800w device on solar.
Since you pulled it off, maybe you could give 'em a rundown on your system, what components you used, how it's set up, what it cost, etc.
 

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Maybe the OP really meant, "How much solar do I need to run the toaster oven?" Maybe there are no batteries. So, 1800W would take 18 standard panels at full sun.
 

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Maybe the OP really meant, "How much solar do I need to run the toaster oven?" Maybe there are no batteries. So, 1800W would take 18 standard panels at full sun.
Exactly; In the real hot locations you can just put bread slices up on top of the solar panels to toast them
 

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Discussion Starter #15
How much electricity (solar powered) will I need to use an 1800 watt toaster oven?
Of course I know I would need batteries, and no it's not for toasting bread. It is to cook food. And yes, I would have a plug in at a camp site. I was wondering what it would take to cook for 30-60 minutes a toaster oven if I was boondocking. I could upgrade to 3000 watt inverter. I haven't started a van build yet--just acquiring information on electricity. Yes, I will be using lithium batteries. Might consider a propane oven.
 

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Of course I know I would need batteries, and no it's not for toasting bread. It is to cook food. And yes, I would have a plug in at a camp site. I was wondering what it would take to cook for 30-60 minutes a toaster oven if I was boondocking. I could upgrade to 3000 watt inverter. I haven't started a van build yet--just acquiring information on electricity. Yes, I will be using lithium batteries. Might consider a propane oven.
@Travelwise

There is "theory" & then what really happens; So Theory 1800W @ 60 mins = 1800WH. Then you have to factor up "your systems inefficiencies" & that is just the theory end of it. Without knowing the equipment you intend to install it is tough to estimate the loss or factor up (this is why you are getting vague responses).

You will get tons of help/advise if you draw up some electrical plans and post them on this thread, then the members won't be guessing on your design.

Anything 12V heat takes a ton of juice.
 

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Of course I know I would need batteries, and no it's not for toasting bread. It is to cook food. And yes, I would have a plug in at a camp site. I was wondering what it would take to cook for 30-60 minutes a toaster oven if I was boondocking. I could upgrade to 3000 watt inverter. I haven't started a van build yet--just acquiring information on electricity. Yes, I will be using lithium batteries. Might consider a propane oven.
To run the toaster oven for 30 minutes would take as much electricity as most people use in a day. To run it for an hour would be prohibitive for just about everyone. To run your toaster oven for an hour it would take as much energy as it takes to run my air conditioner for 4-6 hours and most people would agree you can't run air conditioning off the amount of solar you can fit in a van (you really can't without getting energy from other sources).

A propane oven would be vastly more practical than trying to run a toaster oven off electricity. I have what most people would consider to be a massive battery bank, with a decent sized solar system. But if I needed an oven I would get propane. I get my heat from a Webasto. Other than a microwave or induction cooktop (both in limited use) trying to heat with electricity is difficult in a van.
 

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Of course I know I would need batteries, and no it's not for toasting bread. It is to cook food. And yes, I would have a plug in at a camp site. I was wondering what it would take to cook for 30-60 minutes a toaster oven if I was boondocking. I could upgrade to 3000 watt inverter. I haven't started a van build yet--just acquiring information on electricity. Yes, I will be using lithium batteries. Might consider a propane oven.
OK, now we have something to work with. My Panasonic FlashExpress toaster oven says it uses 1800W. So, 160A for an hour would be 160Amp-hours. But I've looked at the battery monitor and I think the draw is closer to 175A. LI batteries are usually rated to deliver 1C, that is the full current value of their capacity, and can use up to 90% of stated capacity, so my 300Ah battery bank, could comfortably handle the toaster for an hour. On paper you could do it with 200Ah, but it would not leave a lot of power for the rest of the day.

I've only done toast and waffles, so I've never come close to that duration. I'll have to try it some time.

Now we move to the solar question - let's say you run down 250Ah on the day - oven, coffee maker, fridge, lights, etc. Let's move to Watt-hours (because panels are listed in watts) - so that's 250*12 = 3,000 Wh. If you had full sun for 10 hours, you would need 300W of solar panels. But, nobody ever gets the full value out of their panels, so you would probably want to make it 400W. But that is based on ideal conditions. Any shade or clouds or winter days and you are done for. If you really wanted to be able to do this day after day, you'd want more.

I really should run a test on my system to see how all the math works in the real world (AKA the drive way). But to anyone who says it can't or shouldn't be done, in the words of Rebecca Bunch, "The situation is a lot more nuanced than that."
 

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Discussion Starter #19
How much electricity (solar powered) will I need to use an 1800 watt toaster oven?
None if you use this on top of your butane stove. I have one and it works fine and folds up to about 1.5” thick
For just toasting try the best stovetop toaster ever made: Amazon.com: Camp-A-Toaster CT1: Automotive
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Ok, I get it, just use electric oven when I plug in. But I was looking at the Coleman camp oven (above). That looks like it would work if I wanted to bake something. Has anyone tried it?
 
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