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Discussion Starter #1
I have been driving out of warranty with "Particulate filter differential pressure too low" for about 15k miles, not taking it into dealer based on bad experiences while under warranty, and emissions-related experiences of others on this forum. If i had known how easy that sensor was to access i would have looked long ago.

Recently
I got the "Service DEF See Dealer" Countdown of Death at the same time (about 1200 miles after filling at a Flying J).

When i hooked up my code reader, i saw my former "pressure too low" code had been upgraded to
P2453 "Particulate Filter Pressure Sensor range/performance".
Could this be related?

Took a look at my DPF yesterday and found the rubber hose leading to the pressure sensor was cracked. Hopefully this is an easy fix.
Can't find a part number without the metal tubes assembled, so I will (1) take it into a parts store and try to find some high-temp replacement.

As far as the DEF concern, refractometer will be arriving tomorrow.
(2) If the DEF tests good, I will try to top off the tank with some Mopar stuff and hope it resets the countdown.

Any recommendations or advice for my plan (1 & 2 above)?
Or ideas on what kind of hellride I am in for?
I am mostly concerned that my DPF is done for, and that I don't know how to troubleshoot the DEF system. I do not want my van to brick itself.

Which sensor(s) trigger the DPF regen?
If it is only the pressure diff sensor, my DPF will be toast. But I doubt it would even run after this many miles without regens.

Attached a pic of DT Codes when **** hit the fan.
The P0XXX codes have been happening since i bought the van and are very intermittent, though they cause immediate limp mode when they happen. Not specifically asking about these ones now, but if you think they could be related i would be curious to hear.
the P2XXX codes are new (except for the one at the top 'Pressure too low"

After clearing them and driving ~50 miles, P20F5 and P2BA9 did not return.

64397
 

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Discussion Starter #2
So it appears the hose was damaged due to someone improperly routing it too close to the engine, or with having too sharp of a radius.

i was able to cut a couple inches off, flip the direction of the hose and zip tie the DPT diff pressure sensor about 1" away from where it was previously mounted.

Without shifting from neutral i was reading 0.060psi to 0.120psi(when revving to 1500rpm or so).

Any idea what "normal" DPF differential pressure is, or which level triggers a regen?
 

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A reading from the Book of MOPAR, 2014 Chapter 11: FILTER, Diesel Particulate / Operation

"The NO2 molecules in the exhaust temperature range of 300 - 400°C (572 - 753°F) regenerate the Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF), which is passive regeneration. If the passive regeneration cannot keep up with the build up of soot in the DPF, the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) will actively regenerate the DPF to burn off soot. Residue remains inside the DPF in the form of non-burnable ash.

Ash comes from the oils and other materials that are present in the soot. Ash is not eliminated by the regeneration cycle. Excessive ash accumulation requires replacement of the DPF.

The DPF uses a silicon carbide wall-flow monolith with a platinum coating to trap particulates. The monolith contains a large number of square parallel channels, which run in the axial direction and are separated by thin porous walls. The channels are alternatively open at one end, and plugged at the other. The exhaust gases flow through the walls and escape through the pores in the wall material. Particulates, however, are too large to escape and are trapped in the monolith walls. The PCM starts the regeneration of the DPF if the soot load exceeds a mapped value. The PCM determines the load condition of the DPF based upon the engine operating points and the exhaust gas pressure upstream and downstream of the DPF. A pressure differential sensor provides the pressure input to the PCM. During the regeneration process, the PCM raises the temperature in the DPF to burn off soot accumulated. Under normal operation, the engine does not produce enough heat to oxidize the soot in the DPF. This process requires temperatures above 550°C (1,022 °F).

**** The PCM calculates the ash mass stored in the DPF by using the total fuel consumption, which has a strong correlation with oil consumption.

Diagnosis and Testing: RESTRICTION CHECK
  1. Disconnect and remove the upstream (before catalytic converter) oxygen sensor. (Refer to 14 - Fuel System/Fuel Injection/SENSOR, Oxygen - Removal)
  2. Install the Back Pressure Test Adaptor CH8519 .
  3. Connect the Pressure Transducer CH7063 to the back pressure fitting.
  4. Following the PEP module instruction manual, connect all required cables to the scan tool and PEP module. Select the available menu options on the scan tool display screen for using the digital pressure gauge function.
  5. Apply the park brake and start the engine.
  6. With transmission in Park or Neutral, raise engine speed to 2000 RPM. Monitor the pressure readings on the scan tool. Back pressure should not exceed specified limit.
  7. If pressure exceeds maximum limits, inspect exhaust system for restricted component.
    Vehicle in Park/Neutral (no load) @2000 RPM3.45 kPa (0.5 psi)
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thats a handy book to have there, Zoomyn - thanks!

Looking like DPF filter may be alright for now, or at least isn't the thing threatening to brick my van immediately.

An update/musings on the DEF system:

64696


Refractometer tested DEF in the system dead on 32.5%. I drained all the DEF i could easily siphon anyways. Tank reads 8% full on a cheapo OBD Adapter (VLink) + App.

With AlfaOBD I have some different, interesting readings:
64695


These particular graphs were produced after I cleaned the electrical contacts on the underside of the DEF tank. I am not sure if the first graph is supposed to be monitoring how full the tank is or urea %. It has been declining from a solid 100% ever since I drained the tank (several hours ago). The sharp drops represent when the recordings were paused / inactive.
I don't believe the 2015 PM measures DEF quality/urea%. That may be what the unused circular port and terminated connector (blue tip in pic above) are about on the bottom of my DEF tank.

As for the second graph, 33L/hour of DEF is also weird. It was reading a flat zero before I drained the DEF and cleaned up the connectors. Not sure if the pictured white stuff on connectors was some type of contact protectant, or DEF. I would expect more crystalized if DEF.

Hypothesis:
If DEF valve is clogged but I can hear the dosing valve actuate when I perform that test, maybe ECU is rapidly actuating it in order to bring down NOx levels (which do get over 1000 ppm at times while city driving), and its calculating reductant consumption using [number of DEF valve openings]*[expected size of shot].
This might explain the initial P2XXX codes
P20F5: Reductant Consumption too high
P2BA9: NOx Exceedence

I wish the codes would pop again if that's the case.
Starting to suspect that "Service DEF See Dealer" blocks any additional DTCs from being thrown. It was odd that after clearing my codes, some "permanent" codes I've had for 15,000mi disappeared too after some driving.

Tomorrow, I will measure the volume of fluid resulting from the AlfaOBD AdBlue Dosing Valve test, which I assume is the same as the "DEF Injector Test". I recall reading somewhere that I would be looking for 25-35ml.

After that I will probably finish dropping the tank and clean it up. Here is a helpful post on DEF tank removal, (V6 Ecodiesel).
I need to get this SeeDealer countdown to clear as well. 37 miles to "reduced speed".
Obviously, the idea is to resolve the underlying issues first, but it would be nice to not have to do diagnostic drives in limp mode. Any tips there?

I have found via the internet that Star cases S142000006 and/or S1525000009 may reveal how the dealer resets the countdown. I know of no way to access these procedures however.
This post by KilWerBiz has an SCR Healing procedure which would look promising, except I do not have the required functions on my scan tool - slightly annoying since I ditched my former apps and interfaces to get Android/AlfaOBD and OBDLink MX+.

I was really expecting more options / tools on the diagnostic front. I've seen AlfaOBD screencaps showing many SCR-related diagnostics for other vehicles.
Does this look right? Are solenoid and backflow pump DEF related? Any other tests I could/should be doing?

64694


If anyone has thoughts/help to offer, its greatly appreciated, otherwise I'm just documenting this experience for others.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I found AlfaOBD's "Primary Solenoid" test to be the one that actuates the DEF pump solenoid. It is not clear to me if it is supposed to operate like a diaphragm pump. It sounds like one, but i would expect a more forceful shot coming out of it. Initially I was getting one drop every 1-2 clicks.

So I dropped the tank, removed the pump, washed up some mild/moderate looking crystalized DEF near the pump & backflow nozzle. I believe thats what these two ports are - 1 for sending DEF one for receiving it on vehicle shutdown so it doesnt freeze.
64711
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Not sure what that white thing is. Looks almost like a screen, but there is a real mesh screen over the inlet to the right in pic #2. Used a syringe and small hose to push hot water through narrow the metal nozzles. Felt like the flow eased up a bit.

Put some hot water in tank, shook it up, and let it drain through pump/backflow inlets.
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64714

Reattached tank, filled w/ 2.5gal DEF, Ran "Primary Solenoid" test again to find that even less volume was being moved. Effectively nothing. Solenoid still clicks though.

Is the pump bad? What's normal? I don't know what to make of anything.
Thought of triggering a regen and hitting the highway for a few miles. Maybe it would give me a real DTC or magically fix itself.

I'm burnt out. Probably going to have to hit up the stealership this week. I'll try to update if anything productive happens.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Forgot to share this - its the only acknowledgement of a DEF issue and the EVIC countdown of death I could find.
Found when querying ECU System Status.

No system fault codes (DTCs) show when queried - this is all I've got to go off of.

64715
 

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Apologies on random snippets added, this whole system is glossed over in repair manual so likely any good information, clues, hints & tricks, will only be revealed when technicians actually attend/participate in FCA certification training.

Further readings from the Book of Mopar, 2014 Chapter 25, Emissions Control:

The Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) Supply Pump (2) is mounted inside the DEF tank. The DEF Supply Pump:

Has an operating pressure of 9 bar (131 psi).
Capable of reverse flow to evacuate system on shut-down.
Electrically Heated.

ASSEMBLY, Diesel Exhaust Fluid Pump / Operation:

The Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) Supply Pump has many functions. It's primary purpose is to draw fluid from the tank and build adequate system pressure for dosing into the exhaust. The DEF Dosing Control Unit provides the 12 Volt supply and ground to the pump. The DEF Dosing Control Unit provides a Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) signal to the DEF Supply Pump to control the speed and output of the pump. The DEF Supply Pump has an internal temperature sensor which reports the internal temperature of the DEF Supply Pump to the DEF Dosing Control Unit.

INJECTOR, Diesel Exhaust Fluid / Operation:

The Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) Injector is mounted to the mixer tube at the inlet of the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Catalyst. The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) sends a Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) signal to the DEF Injector to vary the amount of fluid sprayed into the exhaust stream.

SENSOR, Diesel Exhaust Fluid Level/Temperature / Operation:

The Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) Tank Level Sensor and Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) Tank Temperature Sensor are a combined sensor used to measure the level and temperature of the fluid in the DEF Tank. Though combined, the level sensor and the temperature sensor operate independent of each other. Both sensors operate as a two wire 5-Volt sensor. The DEF Tank Level Sensor is a 14 point magnetic reed switch sensor. The DEF Tank Temperature Sensor is a negative temperature coefficient sensor.

SENSOR, Diesel Exhaust Fluid Quality / Description:

The Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) Quality Sensor (1) is used to measure the quality of the DEF fluid. The DEF quality sensor is apart of the DEF tank and is NOT a serviceable component. If diagnosis leads you to replace the DEF quality sensor, then you need replace the DEF tank.

64720
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Once again, thanks!

I will try and make a couple extrapolations for my own understanding, and also with the hopes of helping someone else, or of my ignorance being corrected by someone smarter than me.

1) My 2015 PM has no DEF quality sensor. It has a molded cap where one would be on the tank.
- Then what is causing the "UREA Warning Indication (for low Quality)", as seen two posts above?
2) The AlfaOBD "DEF Pump Solenoid" test may be insufficient to diagnose a bad pump since a PWM signal dictates the amount of flow. The solenoid may be for something acting more like a switch for the flow/backflow.
3) Regens are mediated by amount of fuel burned. DPF differential sensor is prob to determine if DPF is getting perma-clogged.


I ended up cleaning the pump again as well as taking out the injector from near the SCR catalyst. Injector seemed functional when I was able to slowly get the pump to fill the line leading to it.
Again, AlfaOBD did not provide me with the options to run standard test procedures mentioned in some other posts.

Went for a drive, watched an active regen run successfully, was seeing reasonable numbers for DEF/consumption (~0.6 L/H) but...
no dice :(

15 miles to death, have an appointment booked to see dealer in 1 week. Not going to be driving much until then.
I will however replace the DEF pump for good measure. I'm doing it for $250.

I have never taken an out-of-warranty vehicle to a dealer and am a little annoyed with how severely the fault data & diagnostic process is obfuscated.
Also that they can, with a probably-inevitable message, make you come in and give them (and only them) money in order to keep your vehicle alive.


Here is what I plan to ask of them.

Deliverables:
  • Diagnose reason for sustained EVIC "Service Def See Dealer" countdown.
    • Reset/clear the countdown, call to advise further action.
  • Diagnose turbo issue (if any): Discrepancy between Commanded & Actual VGT position.
    • Easily observed from sensor data, but no DTCs thrown.
  • Ensure al FCAl ECU updates have been made. Note any updates / changes made to ECU.
  • Please provide process(es) used to clear EVIC "Service DEF" countdown
  • Please provide the following vehicle codes:
    • Key Code / PIN (5 digits, used as "Code Card" key with diagnostic tools)
    • Mechanical Code (used to cut key)
    • Radio Code

Diagnostic Notes: (Is it good to give them this kind of info?)
  • "Pending" DTCs when EVIC DEF warning first appeared (have not reappeared since):
    • P20F5: Reductant Consumption too high
    • P2BA9: NOx Exceedence
  • DEF Pump is NEW, installed less than 15 miles ago.
  • in absence of other procedures to reset EVIC countdown, referring to STAR cases S142000006 and/or S1525000009 may be helpful
 

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Further readings from the Book of Mopar: 2014 Chapter 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics / MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM), 3.0L Diesel / Diagnosis and Testing

Intermittent DTCs...

8. Visually inspect the related wire harness. Disconnect all the related harness connectors. Look for any chafed, pierced, pinched, partially broken wires and broken, bent, pushed out, or corroded terminals.

9. Perform a voltage drop test on the related circuits between the suspected component and the PCM.

10. Inspect and clean all Powertrain Control Module (PCM), engine, and chassis grounds that are related to the most current DTC.

11. If numerous trouble codes were set, use a schematic and inspect any common ground or supply circuits.


P2BA9-00-NOX EXCEEDENCE - INSUFFICIENT REDUCTANT QUALITY : Theory of Operation

The Powrtrain Control Module (PCM) monitors the Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) for quality after every refill event. A refill event means inserting more than one gallon of DEF into the DEF tank. The PCM will not run another monitor (for this DTC) until the next refill event. This DTC will only be active during the drive cycle when the DTC is actually setting. The DTC will remain in ‘stored’ status for the next 39 key cycles. A message will be displayed on the Electronic Vehicle Information Center (EVIC): “Service DEF System – See Dealer Soon”.

This DTC will no longer be displayed after 40 key cycles. But, the SCR Inducement message (“Service DEF System – See Dealer Soon”) will continue to display periodically until the SCR Healing Procedure is performed so the monitor runs again. There may be repairs made per other system DTCs (shown below). There may be repairs recommended per this DTC. Or, there may be no repairs indicated at all. All scenarios must end with the SCR Healing Procedure (shown in P2BA9-00-Test Step 7).

When Monitored: The PCM runs this monitor after every DEF refill event. There are several other criteria for monitoring this DTC including: ambient temperature exceeding -7.0°C (19.4°F), NOx Sensors are active, altitude is lower than 6,800 feet, and the vehicle has been driven at steady highway speeds for a sufficient amount of time.

Set Condition: The PCM uses the (upstream) NOx Sensor 1/1 and the (downstream) NOx Sensor 1/2 feedback to calculate the NOx efficiency. The PCM also factors in engine operating and environmental conditions to calculate the DEF dosing rate. The PCM sets this DTC if the NOx Conversion Efficiency is below a calculated threshold target. The PCM will turn on the Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) immediately after the monitor runs and fails.

Possible Causes:
OTHER SCR, REDUCTANT, OR NOX DTCS PRESENT,
DEF CONTAMINATION
DEF SUPPLY LINE RESTRICTION
SCR CATALYST
DEF INJECTOR
DEF SUPPLY PUMP
SCR HEALING PROCEDURE REQUIRED (TEST STEP 7)

P20F5-00-REDUCTANT CONSUMPTION TOO HIGH : Theory of Operation

The Powrtrain Control Module (PCM) monitors the Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) consumption by comparing the DEF pressure in the supply line to the known DEF Supply Pump volume. This rationality comparison will detect DEF consumption high or low failures. The PCM will illuminate the MIL light immediately after the diagnostics runs and fails. The DEF injection into the after-treatment system will be disabled.

Set Condition: When the PCM detects that the DEF system pressure has been higher than a calibrated threshold for a calibrated amount of time. This is a two Trip Fault.

Possible Causes DEF PRESSURE LINE OR FITTINGS RESTRICTED // DEF SUPPLY PUMP ASSEMBLY

----------------

4.CHECK THE DEF VOLUME FROM THE INJECTOR
1. Turn ignition off.
2. Remove the DEF Injector from the decomposition tube.
NOTE: Leave the DEF Injector harness connector attached to the DEF Injector.
3. Place the DEF Injector in a container to capture the fluid sprayed.
4. Turn the ignition on.
5. Using the scan tool, begin the Diesel Exhaust Fluid Injector Quantity Test.

NOTE: This Test is broken up into three parts: 1–Air Bleed/Build Pressure (about 30 seconds/then empty the container), 2–Main Volume Test (a little over one minute), 3–DEF Purge (to remove excess fluid from the lines after the test). The entire procedure will run for 2–3 minutes before timing out. The amount of flow may fluctuate throughout the test, therefore the test must be allowed to run completely in order for the results to be accurate. The fluid should spray out as a mist. There should be no dripping from the holes in the DEF Injector at any time during the duration of the test procedure.

6. Measure the amount of fluid sprayed after the test times out.
Does the fluid sprayed measure between 26 ml and 35 ml?

Yes •Replace the SCR Catalyst in accordance with the service information.
•IMPORTANT: THE SCR HEALING PROCEDURE (TEST STEP 7) MUST NOW BE PERFORMED.
•Go To 7 (SCR HEALING PROCEDURE)

No
•If above 35 ml: Replace the DEF Injector in accordance with the service information.
•IMPORTANT: THE SCR HEALING PROCEDURE (TEST STEP 7) MUST NOW BE PERFORMED.
•Go To 7 (SCR HEALING PROCEDURE)
•If below 26 ml: Go To 5 (CHECK THE DEF SUPPLY LINE FOR A RESTRICTION)


7. SCR HEALING PROCEDURE

1. Verify that the DEF Tank level is between 25% and 85% full.
2. Please turn the key off for 45 seconds (Complete after-run).
3. Using the scan tool, go Misc. Functions>Perform ‘DEF Tank Level Reset’.
4. Add 1 gallon of Diesel Exhaust Fluid (to trigger refill detection).
NOTE: The ambient air temperature must be above -7.0°C (19.4°F) to continue with this procedure.
NOTE: The vehicle must be below 6,800 ft. altitude to continue with this procedure.
5. At this time, perform a Service Regeneration procedure (see Sect. 11–Exhaust>FILTER, Diesel Particulate).
NOTE: This will prevent DPF Regeneration from occurring during the rest of the Healing Procedure.
6. With the vehicle at full operating temperature, (Using the scan tool) Verify that the DEF system has pressurized.
7. Drive the vehicle at steady highway speeds until the Inducement message on the Cluster is no longer present.
NOTE: Typically a drive of 55 MPH or higher on a highway for 60 minutes should be sufficient.
8. The ‘Service DEF’ message on the EVIC will turn off when this DTC has been successfully healed.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
^^^ Yep that is the ticket for sure. Pretty much a spoon feeding of how to deal with this.
Wonder why so many dealerships have problems dealing with this.

Unfortunately I don't know how to initiate "Diesel Exhaust Fluid Injector Quantity Test" or "DPF tank Level Reset"

This DTC will no longer be displayed after 40 key cycles. But, the SCR Inducement message (“Service DEF System – See Dealer Soon”) will continue to display periodically until the SCR Healing Procedure is performed
What defines a Key Cycle? I have done 40+ of of/off runs for 10min+
but afterwards i read somewhere that coolant temperature must rise 40deg to count as a key cycle.

Scan tool showing "12 warmups since DTCs cleared"

I have not had DTCs for a long time, but what does "Periodic" mean? My EVIC warning is pretty much constant.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Also found this guy in my ECU "system status" logs

SAE PID88, not sure what to make of it.

Cause of inducement: PID88Ah (SCR inducement system actual state)
 

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Apologies in advance, since I don't have & don't want Urea problems...

...I'm not brave enough to click-through the 'replacement functions' to see if there are sub-pages with additional menu choices, yanno like DPF level tank reset, etc....

(Though just now I did find they have a engine 'battery replacement' function, just like Sprinters, wooohoo! (not)).

FOXWELL NT520 PRO DODGE JEEP CHRYSLER DIAGNOSTIC SCANNER TOOL CODE READER NT510 | eBay <--- A mere $160 so I nabbed one in Sept 2018; beware, the service manual will state 'data group reset required' after many of the fun calibration procedures that the scanner alone does not mention. (ignore the NT510 in above eBay adcopy, FOXWELL NT520 PRO from quickshipautoparts )


64761

64762

64763
 

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SAE PID88, not sure what to make of it.... "Cause of inducement: PID88Ah (SCR inducement system actual state)"
Umnn - near zero found on the interwebby yet...

". ..In the European experience it was found that trucks were running with water in their DEF tanks as there was no anti-cheating strategy - or inducement -- to keep the DEF tank filled.. ." (The SCR Inducement Battle Wages On)

So perhaps the internal command for countdown to limp-mode is 'inducement'.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I think that's everything needed for one to solve this. Thanks a bunch!
Wish i knew all this when the warning initially popped.

Now i guess my only hope is to reach 40 "key cycles" and that some magic happens then, as it is my only chance of buying more time/miles to actually complete the necessary procedures.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
One more thing - did you need to enter your vehicle's 5-digit code into the tool to access all these cool tests?
 

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IIRC the unit is fully enabled as shipped -- the only thing requiring any entry is upon registering the unit with man'f to get updates - for which, last time I checked, there are exactly ZERO available. So it's the serial number of the scanner into the FOXWELL website to enable checking if updates are available.

I drove 350~ miles on the 250 mile warning once... got the 'inducement' on the Illinois Toll Road not far out of Chicago after stopping and refueling, didn't think much of it until imagining the worst - I was on way home and selling dealer salesman said bring it in, into service lanes at 5pm and had truck back at 10AM... loose harness connector on DEF tank...
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Umnn - near zero found on the interwebby yet...

". ..In the European experience it was found that trucks were running with water in their DEF tanks as there was no anti-cheating strategy - or inducement -- to keep the DEF tank filled.. ." (The SCR Inducement Battle Wages On)

So perhaps the internal command for countdown to limp-mode is 'inducement'.

A system and method of inducing proper operation of a diesel engine exhaust after-treatment system employing SCR technology monitors components to detect a fault condition representing one of a DEF level fault, a DEF quality fault, and a tampering fault, activates a trigger event indicator in response to detecting the fault condition. The trigger event indicator provides an indicium to an operator of the presence of the fault condition. The system and method also activates an inducement event indicator in response to activating the trigger event indicator. The inducement event indicator provides an indicium to the operator that the engine will be shut down if the fault condition is not addressed within a predetermined time period. The system and method causes shutdown of the engine when the fault condition is not addressed within the predetermined time period.
Imagine if that were your patent.
"Create a system that annoyingly threatens vehicle operators with immobility, and then follows through on threats."
 

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Discussion Starter #18
For anyone curious, Here is what happened at the dealer over 2.5 days. 50/50 if anything was helpful besides adding more miles to countdown and 3 hours' driving!

Ironically, my Foxwell tool came in the mail the day I dropped PM off at dealership. Afterwards I found an option something to the effect of "increase SCR inducement mileage" so hopefully I can just press that forever next time.

65282
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Also, I've driven about 800 miles to Colorado since. Around 500 miles from dealership:
P204B Reductant Pressure Sensor Circuit
P204F Reductant System Performance Bank 1

NOx sensors on both sides of SCR. showing same values (i assume that means no DEF is getting injected)
Unplugging battery seemed to reset something and allow the DEF to flow and reduce the downstream NOx for awhile, but P204F came back.

Now I think I am going to ignore this for awhile and casually look at emissions delete options.
Looking like not a lot of tunes out there for the PM.
 
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Also, I've driven about 800 miles to Colorado since. Around 500 miles from dealership:
P204B Reductant Pressure Sensor Circuit
P204F Reductant System Performance Bank 1

NOx sensors on both sides of SCR. showing same values (i assume that means no DEF is getting injected)
Unplugging battery seemed to reset something and allow the DEF to flow and reduce the downstream NOx for awhile, but P204F came back.

Now I think I am going to ignore this for awhile and casually look at emissions delete options.
Looking like not a lot of tunes out there for the PM.
This one has caught my eye you can go back to stock at any time
 
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