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My PM has 7 windows so I want to make some quality insulated window covers that will still be easily storable. I'm thinking about just filling the back windows in with Polyiso that I could leave at home if necessary but that still leaves the windows in both sliding doors and the front cab. I ordered the full kit from vanupgrades, for anyone else contemplating it they are little more then some reflectix with velcro sewn around the edges... for $300. :eek: Waiting to see about a return now....

Anyways, Has anyone made window covers with thinsulate? I have a decent amount of SM600L leftover I could use for at least the sliders and the windshield. Maybe incased in reflectix? I'd love to see what you came up with!
 

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2014 136” HR
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I made one with insulbright from Walmart as insulation and magnets in the outer banding. Fabric both sides is ripstop nylon. Straightforward construction. It rolls relatively tight for storage. Josh Cissell made some really nice looking ones with reflectix on one side, a quilted black fabric from Walmart on the other.

Remember that Thinsulate gets its insulating value from its loft. Encasing it in reflectix would flatten it and thus seriously diminish its effectiveness. A Thinsulate cover would need to be made as a 1.5"-thick pillow. I have a Thinsulate pillow for my MaxxAir fan and must make sure it doesn't get flattened when it is not on the fan. Two layers of reflectix would also be quite unwieldy for storage.
 

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My PM has 7 windows so I want to make some quality insulated window covers that will still be easily storable. I'm thinking about just filling the back windows in with Polyiso that I could leave at home if necessary but that still leaves the windows in both sliding doors and the front cab. I ordered the full kit from vanupgrades, for anyone else contemplating it they are little more then some reflectix with velcro sewn around the edges... for $300. :eek: Waiting to see about a return now....
My CRLaurence windows are still sitting in their box waiting for me to install them, so I haven't made the covers, yet, but we'll be doing something similar to what we did for my last van, here-

http://fordtransitconnectforum.com/gallery/image/745-windowshade2/

Just some reflectix spray glued to cheap quilted poly fabric w/ a black edge sewn on them and a few small magnets inserted in the edge to hold them to the window. They worked really well in the sun/heat during extended trips out West and during hot summers here in the East when the van was parked in the sun.

I think using the 400-weight Thinsulate would be even better, especially to keep warmth in on colder nights. Since it compresses, you can do the same roll-up design as the previous covers and make them easy to store when not in use
 

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2014 136” HR
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"I think using the 400-weight Thinsulate would be even better, especially to keep warmth in on colder nights. Since it compresses, you can do the same roll-up design as the previous covers and make them easy to store when not in use."

Except that when Thinsulate is compressed, it needs time to decompress. It doesn't just pop out to its full thickness.
 

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2014, 138WB, High Roof, Gas, SW MT
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Hi,

We used simple homemade Reflectex shades cut out to fit in the window.
See the bottom of this page: http://www.buildagreenrv.com/our-conversion/promaster-camper-van-conversion-curtains-for-windows/

Obviously, they could look a lot better -- we had intended them to be temporary until we did some nicer ones, but that was 3 years ago :)
The nice thing about them is that they don't take much storage space -- they take up about 1/3rd of the shelf over the cab (this is for 7 windows plus the windshield). Very quick to put up and take down.


Did a thermal test on these shades and they cut the window heat loss by about a factor of 3 - pretty effective.
Test details here: http://www.buildagreenrv.com/our-co...on-curtains-for-windows/curtain-thermal-test/
I'd guess that most of the effectiveness of the two reflective layers facing airspaces as the insulating value of the Reflectex itself is near zero.


I guess Thinsulate ones could store pretty compactly if they could be rolled up to compress the insulation.

Gary
 

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I like the Thinsulate idea to attenuate outside noise!

We are windows people too.

I also like the benefit of reflectix for reflective insulation. We use this method, putting our home made reflectix panel up next to the glass (curtains or fabric facing on the inside of the van), when it is hot/sunny and we want to maintain cool. When it is cold out and we want to reflect our interior heat we reverse things (fabric facing facing out, curtains between the window and the reflectix. Seems to actually work.
 

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I made temporary reflectix window covers with magnets that we've been using since November. They've worked well. I have started working on my permanent fix. As MrsNomer said I have reflectix with some thin insulation material from Walmart that is glued to the inside side of the reflectix. Then I used a black quilted material to cover each side. The quilted material has a thin layer on the backside to could help insulate just a tad bit more. I sewed those two pieces together with bias tape around the edges (like a pocket) then inserted the reflectix and finished sewing up the opening. Then I sewed magnets into the edges. So far I only have the two rear windows finished. I'll post some pictures later today.

I'm pleased with the outcome of my two rear window covers. I made them 1 inch bigger than the window so at night no light can be seen when looking in from the outside.

Sent from my SM-P900 using Tapatalk
 

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I made temporary reflectix window covers with magnets that we've been using since November. They've worked well. I have started working on my permanent fix. As MrsNomer said I have reflectix with some thin insulation material from Walmart that is glued to the inside side of the reflectix. Then I used a black quilted material to cover each side. The quilted material has a thin layer on the backside to could help insulate just a tad bit more. I sewed those two pieces together with bias tape around the edges (like a pocket) then inserted the reflectix and finished sewing up the opening. Then I sewed magnets into the edges. So far I only have the two rear windows finished. I'll post some pictures later today.

I'm pleased with the outcome of my two rear window covers. I made them 1 inch bigger than the window so at night no light can be seen when looking in from the outside.

Sent from my SM-P900 using Tapatalk
Looking to do something similar. Do you have any pictures or more info on how they have worked in cold temps?
 

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2014, 138WB, High Roof, Gas, SW MT
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I made temporary reflectix window covers with magnets that we've been using since November. They've worked well. I have started working on my permanent fix. As MrsNomer said I have reflectix with some thin insulation material from Walmart that is glued to the inside side of the reflectix. Then I used a black quilted material to cover each side. The quilted material has a thin layer on the backside to could help insulate just a tad bit more. I sewed those two pieces together with bias tape around the edges (like a pocket) then inserted the reflectix and finished sewing up the opening. Then I sewed magnets into the edges. So far I only have the two rear windows finished. I'll post some pictures later today.

I'm pleased with the outcome of my two rear window covers. I made them 1 inch bigger than the window so at night no light can be seen when looking in from the outside.

Sent from my SM-P900 using Tapatalk
Hi Josh,
Good to bear in mind that most of the insulating value of Reflectex are the reflective inside and outside layers. The inside layer helps because it reflects most of the IR heat radiation from the inside of the van back into the van -- a dark color fabric (maybe even a light color fabric ) absorbs IR heat radiation from the inside of the van, and that heats up the shade, so it loses more heat to the outside. The outside reflective layer has a low emissivity, so it is a poor radiator of IR heat to the outside -- if the shade is say at 70F, and has a low emissivity surface on the outside (like Reflectex) it will emit much less heat radiation than something like a dark fabric.

If you cover the Reflectex with fabric, the reflective and low emissivity benefits are lost -- so, it loses its best characteristics

So, wondering if you would be better off to leave out the Reflectex and replace it with something (maybe a bit thicker) with a good R value per inch. Not sure what that material might be -- maybe thin layer of thinsulate, or some other foam material that has a good R value per inch?

Just a thought.

Gary
 

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I went to Lowes and bought 2 inch thick insulating foam (8x4 feet) then used some think brown paper to trace the windows in a van I used to have. I cut the paper, layer it out on the foam and then cut the foam board with a long serrated knife. The foam fit snugly into the recess, especially when i used some velcro to help hold them in place. The foam helped a lot when camping in cold weather and during the summer. The foam was fairly easy to remove and place into storage when I didn't need them. My van was white, I placed the white side of the foam towards the outside, and it looked "factory". I suppose if your van was a different color, you could use a water based latex and get a color that compliments the exterior of your ProMaster and it would "blend in" to the color of the outside of the van. I did peel off the thin, clear plastic membrane on the interior side to get a white "color" rather than the bright silver that comes on this foam board. You have to use water based latex because the other paints having a petroleum based oil will actually "eat" into the foam.

For me, this worked very well... Pop them in, pop them out.
 
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