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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all diesel owners. I've been looking at the diesel PM, and there are a few people on here with so far unsolvable issues with their diesels.

I know there are also a bunch of diesel owners who are not having any issues at all. Those owners that are not having any issues seem to drive a lot of highway miles, like Adrian.

Are there any diesel PM owners who drive mostly in the city who are also trouble free, or are most of the issues being had by people who don't do a lot of highway miles ?

I ask because I only do about 10,000 miles per year and most of it is rural commuting. I only get to 60 mph once on my commute and it's only for 5 miles.
 

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I have about 2500 miles on my 136" high roof 2500 diesel. I drive about 50% city/back roads and the rest four lane. I usually don't exceed 65mph. I try to drive at least once a week down the interstate for 30-40 miles at 65mph.
I have had no problems at all with the van.
BTW I will be at Deal's Gap the week of 3 May for the 2-stroke meet. The van will be hauling three bikes. Will be staying at the hotel at the intersection of 129 and 28.

Frank
Decatur, AL
 

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Dunno about the PM but in the VW TDI world, there's some truth to that, and it's the same type of technology involved.

I have a friend with a Golf TDI who has a short urban commute, and he recently had to have the DPF replaced (among other things) with less than 100,000 km on it.

At 10,000 mi per year, the economics of the diesel engine probably don't work out for you, anyhow. My annual mileage is the same or perhaps a little less (but almost all highway ... it will be used probably 12 - 15 times per year but for several hundred km at a time), and our fuel prices are higher than yours, and it did not make sense to pay the extra for the diesel.
 

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Hah ... Speaking of Deals Gap (and the ProMaster!) we are heading down there next Friday, arriving Saturday. If you see a red PM 136/low roof with Ontario plates, that would probably be mine ... We're loading up bikes tomorrow.
 

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As a very general rule, gas is going to be more robust than diesel for this kind of city/short trip/infrequent driving. Diesel takes longer to warm up, harder to start in cold weather, and excels at steady state highway driving.

Gas, on the other hand, is now very hydroscopic with its alcohol content, so it has a "shelf life" of maybe 3 months. As long as you drive enough to burn a tank a month, no worries. All engines benefit from at least 1 long drive a month to steam the water out of the oil.

But at $4000 more for the diesel, its gonna take you decades to break even. Go gas.
 

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Kip may be right but possibly misses the point. I bought a diesel for the advantages it gives in drivability and for what I see as a better transmission. I probably won't drive huge annual miles but won't idle around town or have to spend lots of time in slow traffic either. I saw the price difference as worth the difference for my use not just for dollar savings although I hope to realize that.
I would like the OP's question answered. Are there commuters out their who are not having problems with the diesel in their use?
Is there a High Idle option for when we have to?
 

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I bought a diesel for the advantages it gives in drivability and for what I see as a better transmission. I probably won't drive huge annual miles but won't idle around town or have to spend lots of time in slow traffic either.
Right there with ya. We went with the diesel for the driving style provided by it and the transmission. Loved it. While it will probably see around town use once/week (load my bicycle in, drive to work, and then to our weekly time trial events), that will include some highway time. The rest of the time it will see weekend drives to locations 2-5 hours away. Probably be used 2-3 weekends/month. And then there will be the occasional extra long road trip (we're already planning one from WA to NM over Thanksgiving, with a few days spent wandering around UT).


I'm figuring that a later build date, doing a 'proper' break-in (though frequently said is not required), and avoiding general in-town dawdling; all of that together should help prevent issues early on.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
BTW I will be at Deal's Gap the week of 3 May for the 2-stroke meet.

If you've been going to that annual two stroke meet for years, we've probably met. I worked there from 01 to 07. Best commute I ever had. Also the worst.
 

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Back in the old days, turning on the AC would automatically engage high idle and kick on the main fan as well. That's a cheap fix if it works.
 

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Funny the 2stroke meet is mentioned.
Like a 2stroke, I bet the diesel needs the highway miles to clean out the exhaust & DPF.

BTW, I have an old 72' T500, 75' H2 & a Service Honda CR500AF
2strokes rule!
 

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If you are doing a weekly highway run, I'm sure it will be fine. That is enough time for the regeneration system to do its thing to keep the DPF clean.
 

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If you've been going to that annual two stroke meet for years, we've probably met. I worked there from 01 to 07. Best commute I ever had. Also the worst.
My first meet was in '01 and have attended all since then. I'm sure we have met.

Frank
Decatur, AL
 

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The small number of Diesel problems have nothing to due with driver habits but rather they are all pre existing problems from the factory!

The diesel PM has something other manufacturers do not have, and that's a message letting the driver know when the DPF filter reaches 80% full to drive for 20 minutes. If sprinters and other diesel put this small feature in fewer problems would occur. The Pm has this wonderfully simple feature. The filter will never reach 80% full even with stop n go traffic. Even low speed driving will allow enough heat to be generated to allow Regen. Sure highway speeds will reach temps quicker but lower speeds as long as they exceed the very short trips will allow heat for quick Regen. Regen even occurs during idling. The only time the DPF can reach 80% is during exclusive short trips less than 5 mile drives. Those drivers will get the message and will occasionally have to take longer drives when the message appears in the display.

Remember this motor has been in Fuso box trucks. Around Chicago area these trucks in winter idle literally all day and never go about 35 mph in heavy traffic. Plenty of heat generated for regens whenever they are necessary without any problems.

Same in Europe, many small towns and speeds are Lowe than here in USA. They have DPF filters as well. Majority of their vans are diesel and large percentage of passenger cars are diesel. The diesel is newer to us but I am very confident in stating that this van will be robust, engine/ trans, with record high mileage milestones!

It is the best most capable vehicle I have ever owned. The feel of longevity and solid feel is so very evident after spending some miles driving this van.
 
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