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2021 Promaster 2500 high roof 136wb in white
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am preparing to cut and install the FRP panels for my shower and was wondering what the best way to cut it would be? It looks easy enough to score and snap but that only works with straight cuts. I have heard that electric sheet metal shears do a good job and was wondering if that is the best way to go. A hole saw will take care of my shower light but my mixer valve requires a square hole that I will cut in the plywood before the FRP install and I will trim it out before I install the valve.
 

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2014 136” HR
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I’ve never worked with FRP, so this is just a thought—could you use the plywood as a template and route it out with a finishing bit?
 

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2021 Promaster 2500 high roof 136wb in white
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I’ve never worked with FRP, so this is just a thought—could you use the plywood as a template and route it out with a finishing bit?
The shower is assembled already minus the FRP, I have made cardboard templates that I will transfer to 1/8" plywood to verify the fit, the smooth FRP was not cheap and I do not want to cut it short.
 

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I tried textured FRP, but didn't like working with it and nixed it from my build, but it did seem to cut ok with a cordless circular saw. It is a bit dusty! The stuff I tried tended to break off oddly, so I would be hesitant to use sheers. Maybe it works fine, but I just can't picture it given my limited experience.
 

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2021 1500 136"WB High top
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I used the textured stuff. It wasn't my favorite from the start, but it was all I could find/afford for the task at hand. I used a circular saw and a jig saw, each with a special blade. I started w/o a good blade and it chewed the material, spitting out plastic. So I got a new blade. I didn't like the finished look because it just looked unfinished: cheap edges meeting another edge. So I finished all the edges with frp trim. There's a trim for every kind of corner and edge and I used most of them. It really classed up the crappy material. Despite the disaster that was my shower walls were, they look pretty good.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/852-1-2-in-x-3-4-in-x-8-ft-PVC-Composite-White-Outside-Corner-Moulding-0085208011/100540903
 

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2021 3500 Extended
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I did the ceiling in the pontoon with FRP. I used a Dremel US40 Ultra saw with the blade that came with it:

You will need some sawhorses, and a straight edge to clamp down on the FRP where you want to cut, then just run the saw along the face of the straight edge.

I think I am going to use it for the PM ceiling because it's only .09" thick and I won't lose too much headspace. Yes, the end and corner edging pieces make it look mucho better.

 

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2021 1500 136"WB High top
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I think I am going to use it for the PM ceiling because it's only .09" thick and I won't lose too much headspace. Yes, the end and corner edging pieces make it look mucho better.
Tin is thin, and light, with tons of different styles and colors... The colored versions get expensive, but it paints up real nice.

Brown Photograph Mammal Natural material Font
 

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2018 136" HR
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I have use the plastic sheet on my vw van. I don't like the look of it since its not that stiff, seems to sag and look wavy. In my current build I use aluminum composite panel that I got from a local sign store. They are really stiff but on the heavy side compare to similar thickness door skin plywood. They come in several color(I got gloss white) and super easy to cut straight line.
 

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I glued mine to the walls using Loctite Tub Surround Construction Adhesive. It's definitely flimsy stuff, and kind of heavy. (the textured FRP)
 

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Jig saw with a fine tooth blade. We made templates out of cardboard and traced those onto the FRP. Keep the edge you’re cutting well supported underneath and change blades as they dull. Any holes for screws/anchors were melted thru by heating a drill bit with a small butane torch. Covered in headliner material or Naugahyde glued with 3M spray glue. I like that it can easily be easily curved and is mold proof. Once it’s attached properly it’s very sturdy.
 

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I did a shower with textured frp panels and was worried about cutting and having them possibly split, crack or other. In the end I found that they were extremely resilient and easy to cut. I cut my first with a diamond blade in my skill saw. Later I cut them on my table saw with a fine tooth blade and they turned out great. A find jigsaw worked out well. When I installed mine I had an overhang of approx 0.5" outside the shower. I took my router with a flush trim bit and it routed easily. I did holes with a hole saw, drill bits and a roto zip. The material is hard so it can wear your blades down. It also creates a lot of fiberglass dust so make sure you wear a mask.

My difficulty was gluing the panels to plywood walls. I did it in the fall when it was cooler in Canada but still above the required temperature for the adhesive. I used a titebond fastgrab adhesive, installed it as directed let it sit clamped up for two days and I still had panel sections lifting up especially in the corners. This stuff takes a long time to cure properly and on some test pieces it did not have the best adhesion to the frp. PL premium provide an excellent bond that I could not break. I would have preferred to use liquid nails frp adhesive or a different solvent based adhesive.
 

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2021 1500 136"WB High top
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My difficulty was gluing the panels to plywood walls.
I'm no pro at all, but I really liked the stuff I used (Loctite Tub Surround Construction Adhesive). It has a thick consistency, but not as thick as Caulk. I even used it on my ceiling to fill the gaps at the seams between the tin and the .25x.75 wood trim. It filled those gaps beautifully, and to this day, in 100• temps and 26• temps –– it has not cracked or shrunk.

It held my FRP shower walls instantly. My shower walls were in pieces because I installed them last, even after the barn door. Admittedly this was really stupid, but I was anxious to finish and terrified of everything electric. Anyway, I did use spring rods and boards to hold it to the walls in place with pressure for 24 hours. I let the loctite bleed out from the trim then smoothed it as best as I could to ensure it was waterproof. So it does look a little messy, less in person than in these pics. Photos tend to flatten things, and in person the trim stands out more than the smears.

Here are pictures. My goal was to survive disaster and install waterproof walls, so to me this was a success. :geek: (The extra bar is for when I use the bathroom as a closet.)

Floor Line Automotive exterior Wood Bumper
Interior design Grey Rectangle Gas Fixture


Property Building Wood Architecture Line
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I am all set to cut the FRP and checked the instructions, the manufacturer recommends a gap of 1/4" top and bottom and 1/8" on the sides for expansion, that is for a 4×8 sheet. I had planned to butt it up to my cabinet faces, what is really necessary?
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I didn’t do that. Wouldn’t that defy the purpose of making it waterproof?
 

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2021 Promaster 2500 high roof 136wb in white
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
You have to allow for expansion. You can use silicon caulking at the joints
I was afraid of that, I will use the filler strips in the back corners to fill in the gaps and use my shower door frame to hide the gaps at the front. We plan to spend time in the desert and I dont want the shower panels to buckle.
 
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