Ram Promaster Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
888 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I had a new HVAC system installed in my house today and the contractor was driving a Promaster. They said they had 3 Promasters in their fleet. They loved them except for these wear and tear issues. All bumpers torn and falling apart. All rear door wiring looms cracked in half, so wires exposed.

Interesting stuff. I can almost excuse the door wire loom issue, if the Ducato doors only open 180 degrees. But not the bumpers being under designed.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Interesting. For those of us doing camper-style conversions, I can't see this being too much of an issue. (Won't typically be going in and out a lot from the back, unlike the trades.) Still, something to watch for, especially as these PMs age. Thanks!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,478 Posts
Tradesmen are notorious for destroying their vans. In over 45 years of being in the construction industry I can't remember anyone (other than me) that didn't destroy a new van after two or three years.

I agree this shouldn't be a problem for us camper converters or even tradesmen owners. It's the employees are tough on the company vehicles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
Sadly, the people who drive them don't pay for them and take care of them that way. I assure you that mine, that I paid for, doesn't look anything like that and it just had its 3rd birthday. I do flooring installations, carpet, hardwood, ceramic tile, vinyl and lino and know that I use my van as hard as they do...I just don't abuse it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
When I added LED's to the back door I noticed the wire loom conduit was a little weak at the connection point and I went ahead and wrapped both ends where it connects with electrical tape. I Plan to get a white bed liner type paint and doo all my door thresholds I am seeing wear the the driver door and the side and back doors.
 

·
Registered
2014-159 HR in CT
Joined
·
3,650 Posts
Someone here had mentioned the cracked bumper issue. I noticed a small crack lengthwise on my bumper on the passenger side. I use the back door to get in from my carport most of the time when I'm leaving from home.

Seems like there isn;t enough support under the bumper so it flexes and starts to crack.. not a big deal on mine so far.

Hoping the dealer will replace before i get to my 3 year anniversary!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
810 Posts
We'll be using the back doors a lot, but not using the camper a lot so I'm not too worried but did find Jimmbomb suggestion of greasing of interest.
More info please.
I used garage door lube because of cold weather conditions on a paper towel. Rub it on the backside of the plastic loom and shove it into the hole where it goes into the door.
Open the door halfway, pull the loom out of the door some for more slack, then grease up that hole guide were the loom slides on the hole giude.
And from now on, I watch the loom as I close the doors. No more kinking.
Good kuck
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
I will agree with the rear door wiring loom issue, we've had to replace one already in the second year.

I will not agree with the rear bumper cover abuse, that's avoidable by employees to a large degree, and if it isn't, the cover is quickly and easily replaceable, though I can't say what it costs. It was the easiest thing about installing the combo rear step & Hitch we built. (see another post I put up with pics of that)

We use that step as a step, and as a flat for quick cutting of material moldings. (vinyl, wood and aluminum trims, for example; if we don't have enough cuts to set up an actual cutting table we use the bumper step) I would think that even in a fast paced work environment, that damage in the pic could have been avoided with little effort.

Bottom line, I'd be pointing out to the employees quickly, that all vehicle repair and replacement costs come directly out of our bottom line at the end of the year, and so do Xmas bonuses. It's really simple, if a bit harsh, but if they take care of it, the company does not have to pay to fix it, our bottom line is better at the end of each year. Places control right into their hands and there is no excuse for abusing tools, no matter what it is.

One of our last vans, a 1987, has 309K miles on it, and counting, though it's on limited duty now since we purchased the Promaster to replace it. It does not have a fraction of that damage on the rear bumper. I've also found that customers routinely look at your van or truck, and judge you and what kind of job you will do for them, by the way you take care of your own stuff. We had many good comments on how long we have had that '87 van.

Just some thoughts.....HTH
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
888 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
My rear bumper was replaced under warranty. Once out of warranty cost is about $90 plus core charge if not bought at dealer.

It can split at the ribs. The ribs make it ready to split quite easy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Ok, I've attached two photos to try and show the retractable wire loom assembly. This is the one that we just replaced under warranty. It broke in the same place as the other poster showed above. When it did, we "reinforced it" with another larger piece of wire loom over the top of the break, and held in in place with a minimal wrap of gorilla tape at the joint. We liked it so well, we reinforced the other side, even though it wasn't broken, and reinforced the warranty replacement in the same way. We were careful to be sure that the cable still fully retracted into the hole when the door is shut completely; that the extra 2" piece of loom and tape did not interfere. You can see it in the first photo reasonably well.

Two things: first, I would not want any oily lubricant on the loom. You can see how much dust gets into the door. Anything oily would gather that dirt and make it stay in that track and cause more troubles soon. We used teflon, a DRY lubricant, noting that some teflon "propellents", not the actual teflon (PTFE) will melt some plastics so beware of what you spray.

Second, it's not the loom itself that drags, so much as the shoe that's on each end of it, so lube in the track is better than on the loom itself. However, if you spray with the door panel off, you'll get both. Also, if you take the panel off, you'll likely break some fasteners, I'm good at it, and still broke some; they're stubborn and brittle compared to most. Do it above 70 degrees for better luck saving and reusing them.

One other observation, is that the whole things seems almost too long for the track when the door is fully shut. In hte pic you can see it "humping" out of the track due to that length. I see no solution to that, at least not a quick one.

So, there's my two cents for the day, hope it's helpful.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts
I recently had the rear door harness issue on my PM. In my case, the cause of the problem was leaving the doors in the fully open position in cold weather. The loom became stiff and stayed bent when closing the door, not allowing the harness to retract properly. This caused the hinge / body mount end to break. Once this happened it was only a short time before the wires became damaged. This resulted in a blown fuse for the door locks and the rear defrost. The dealer replaced both harnesses under warranty. It appears that Chrysler is using a more flexible loom material on the new harnesses. It's only been a few days, but the new harnesses seem to be working better. I had the doors fully open in the cold today for several hours and things retracted correctly when closing them. Albeit, I was more cautious as I am now aware of the potential issue.
 
  • Like
Reactions: KNDLKSTMS
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top