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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

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I used Pan Head, phillips drive screws in stainless steel as I knew they would show and I think the look is a bit more elegant, I like that look of those truss head screws too. Each to their own. Phillips head drive will work fine IMHO.
 

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Phillips tend to strip the head faster than hex head. They also make a "zip" screw that we use in ductwork. No drill tip but they push through thin steel quickly. #8X1 /2 or #8x3 /4. I believe a company called malco makes them.
 

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Assuming that you can give up 3/4 inch head room I would do this: Use 1 x 4 lumber (actually 3/4 inches thick) run lengthwise attached to the metal ribs about 16 inches apart. Install insulation above these strips; and the insulation can be thicker using this method. Then install finished ceiling by screwing to these wood strips.
 

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For looks, look into oval head screws and cup washers. Back in 1974 I used brass oval head wood screws and brass cup washers the hole was pre drilled and then tapped with a sheet metal screw. It did look good on the burl wood ceiling and held up just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Assuming that you can give up 3/4 inch head room I would do this: Use 1 x 4 lumber (actually 3/4 inches thick) run lengthwise attached to the metal ribs about 16 inches apart. Install insulation above these strips; and the insulation can be thicker using this method. Then install finished ceiling by screwing to these wood strips.
I have the low roof so my goal is to loose as little height as possible. I am putting insulation between the supports.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Phillips tend to strip the head faster than hex head. They also make a "zip" screw that we use in ductwork. No drill tip but they push through thin steel quickly. #8X1 /2 or #8x3 /4. I believe a company called malco makes them.
The ones I found all had a hex head. I do like the looks of the Philips better. I will need to be careful so I do not strip them.
 

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It is quite easy to strip the threads when using a sheet metal screw in thin sheet metal such as is in the ribs. The vibration experienced in normal vehicle use will make thread failure more likely. A pop rivet gives a more secure permanent attachment and is very easy to use. Perhaps either one would be satisfactory but depending on your design repair of a failed fastener may not be easy. Use of an elastomeric adhesive in the joint should also help with integrity of the fastening.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
It is quite easy to strip the threads when using a sheet metal screw in thin sheet metal such as is in the ribs. The vibration experienced in normal vehicle use will make thread failure more likely. A pop rivet gives a more secure permanent attachment and is very easy to use. Perhaps either one would be satisfactory but depending on your design repair of a failed fastener may not be easy. Use of an elastomeric adhesive in the joint should also help with integrity of the fastening.
An adhesive like this?
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Loctite-0-2-fl-oz-Threadlocker-Blue-242-209728/100371826#customer_reviews
 

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.... I do like the looks of the Philips better. I will need to be careful so I do not strip them.

Two things that help to strip them are using the wrong size Philips head driver and not having the experience to adjust the pressure that you are using to what is happening. A third could be slipping into the wrong drive angle. They will also break if you tighten them too much.
If you have the time to drill a small pilot hole first they will drive slick as snot.
 

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The bit you want is P2R aka drywall bit
https://www.amazon.com/Bosch-BBT25P2R-25-Piece-Big-Screwdriving/dp/B004Q00NDE

The washers are called finishing washers
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias=tools&field-keywords=finishing+washers

I have used self drilling phillips screws in my last 4 trucks without a problem, 500k miles total

I screwed my 1/4" underlayment ply right to the ribs with Lath screws
https://www.amazon.com/Brands-21524...F8&qid=1476059694&sr=1-6&keywords=lath+screws
 

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The bit you want is P2R aka drywall bit
https://www.amazon.com/Bosch-BBT25P2R-25-Piece-Big-Screwdriving/dp/B004Q00NDE

The washers are called finishing washers
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias=tools&field-keywords=finishing+washers

I have used self drilling phillips screws in my last 4 trucks without a problem, 500k miles total

I screwed my 1/4" underlayment ply right to the ribs with Lath screws
https://www.amazon.com/Brands-21524...F8&qid=1476059694&sr=1-6&keywords=lath+screws
In building a van conversion we are all essentially acting as our own design engineers, which can be both good and bad. I personally don't like the idea of using sheet metal screws in thin metal in a continually vibrating structural application where other reasonably priced alternatives exist. I use pop rivets as they are inexpensive and require little more effort than sheet metal screws, but must be drilled out for removal. Rivnuts are excellent, but require significant effort for installation and positioning of holes in the material being attached. Loctite and similar liquids are apparently designed for bolts with at least several threads of engagement, not sheet metal screws. I add polyurethane construction adhesive or a urethane caulk to virtually all joints. Guess we all make our choices and have to live with the results.
 

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Guys and Gals..... Really? Self drilling and tapping screws are used in many consumer goods in metal much thinner than those ribs including washing machines, dryers, and electronic cabinets which get at least as much vibration as our vans. I used them, found them convenient to attach my interior, have removed some in my ceiling ribs which can be taken down for wiring modifications and they have held. I don’t disagree there may be better choices but sometimes good enough is just as good as exceptional. Personally I dislike poprivits which are soft, weak, and ugly so it may just be a preference. I’d also say just drive’em with whatever you have. I was a building contractor and have all these specialized bits but really..... any phillips bit will work. For driving screws we used to buy square drive but enough of misleading our fellow builders into thinking here is a “right” screw. Just screw it!
 

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..... any phillips bit will work...

The body of your post is correct, I would think, but there is a big difference between a Phillips point size #1 and #4 . Using one in place of the other is not going to work well.
Sorry to argue but that's IMHO
 

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Skaggydog, You are so right, thanks for the clarification no argument as we agree I was remiss in not pointing that out. Most screws we use are #2 . The P2 will work fine. The P2R releases a sheetrock screw from your specialized sheetrock screw gun better and they last longer to. If anyone is using one of those guns and putting lots of sheetrock screws in their panels they would be wise to invest. Otherwise the normal P2 (even the cheapy that came with your variable speed drill) will work for a while. The more we use tools the more discriminating we become. Go over to a carpenter forum and long disagreements over which sheetrock gun is best/fastest/reliable etc can be enjoyed! I had a carpenter insist on using a “Dimpler” and his regular cordless drill. He turned out to be temporary help. LOL
 
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