Ram Promaster Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
HI I just bought this fuse block below and as far as I can tell there is no need for a separate bus bar with this. I'm new to electrical but I've seen many electrical systems online where people get a separate positive bus bar with this fuse block and it seems redundant and not necessary to me.

Is this true?

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
That is what I did. I ran 4 positive lines to the terminal on the battery, 1 for this block, 1 for the solar converter, 1 for the inverter and 1 for the smart charger/isolator from the vehicle battery. I had to get a slightly longer bolt for the positive side to fit all 4. On the negative side just one from the battery to the 500 amp shunt and then the same 4 on the other side of the shunt. The bus bar would make it a little easier to add and replace loads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,705 Posts
It depends on the size and complexity of your system. If you have a big system, bus bars help you manage larger cables/currents than a typical fuse block can handle. I have beefy bus bars (+ and -) to connect multiple batteries to a cut-off switch, and to centralize large-cable connections to charging sources, an inverter-charger, and the DC fuse panel.
 

·
Registered
2017 - 2500 159
Joined
·
474 Posts
I ran the positives to a double fuse block mounted on the positive terminal. Inverter to one, and 3 smaller wires to the other (solar, alternator charger, and DC fuse block). Used a negative bus after my shunt. Yeah you can wire multiple lugs to one terminal but they end up having to angle all different directions.

 

·
Premium Member
2014, 138WB, High Roof, Gas
Joined
·
1,928 Posts
Yes - you can do that.
I have 4 or 5 wires coming into the positive terminal on my house battery, and it works fine.

Remember, all of those wires that leave the positive terminal on the house battery need to have a fuse or circuit breaker, and that each of them should be mounted as close to the battery as possible.

I really also like the 2 terminal stud fuse block mentioned above - the only thing that made me not use it is that unlike a breaker, you have to carry spare fuses and it does not provide a means to turn off power to the loads it serves (ie you can't use it like a switch), but still seems like a good way to go in that it provides an extra terminal to hook to, and it puts the protection right at the battery terminal.

Gary
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
550 Posts
You are correct that this is redundant and unnecessary in most cases. 'Many electrical systems online where people' are trying to sell components they used rather than have any idea what they're doing. It does somewhat depend on your full system design and a busbar could allow for ease of installation and a clean look whether or not the post space is need, however a bus bar is not 'mandatory' most of the time.

Looks as though that model fuse block allows 100a input and a max of 30a branch circuits. It should not be used as a bus for other large components (inverters/chargers). These can all come directly from the batteries rather than battery to bus bar to devices, as others are suggesting.

A busbar is really just an extension of the battery terminals. If you have enough feeds to make it hard to attach them all to the batteries posts, or all the devices are a similar distance away it may make sense to use the busbar. Can be thought of as an extension cord/splitter/power strip
 

·
Registered
2018 3500 EXT
Joined
·
2,233 Posts
HI I just bought this fuse block below and as far as I can tell there is no need for a separate bus bar with this. I'm new to electrical but I've seen many electrical systems online where people get a separate positive bus bar with this fuse block and it seems redundant and not necessary to me.

Is this true?

That is exactly what I purchased for my cabin (not setup yet).

My van has a different system, as I have a “Power Center”.
 

·
Registered
2019 159 High Top - White, of course!
Joined
·
182 Posts
Bus bars can be useful if you have a bunch of wires/cables to connect to your battery bank. And the heavier the cables,the more useful they become to have a neat system. INHO.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top