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I've done a fair amount of searching and I can't seem to find a good guide/method of wall building for the Promaster.

I've seen other vans where they use furring strips then adhere boards to them, but I'm not sure this will work with the Promaster as there are a few spots that jut out further than the rest of the wall. Just curious if anyone has found a good method they could share.

Thanks!
 

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For the ceiling I just glued Polyisocyanurate 1” insulation between the ribs, covered it with headliner fabric and then made covers for the ribs. No headroom lost. In the walls I had the factory upper and lower panels and rib covers so I just pulled them out and glued poliiso to the walls with Great Stuff gaps and cracks from a progun and returned the factory panels. No “walls” were built or needed. There have been posters on here who had the factory panels for sale. They are black but cuuld be covered with fabric or painted if you wanted a different look.
http://www.promasterforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=37177&page=3
http://www.promasterforum.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=14513&d=1442529470
 

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If you go to my build (link is in my signature), you can see how I did it. Most people just put wood strapping over the ribs if they don’t have the upper and lower panels as RD does and then attach ¼" plywood to it. Self tapping screws work fine just make sure you don’t use ones that are too long!
 

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I don’t have a “good” solution, but I did finish mine maximizing every fraction of an inch I could. There were many times I wondered of that was worth it.

I have windows. I cut 1x4 to go around them closely, and add some “studs”. I carefully scribed the outer skin onto the studs and shaped them to for the walls. Then I used 3M 5200 to adhere them to the walls. After insulation, I cut the panels to fit in between the big pillars, then screwed that 3mm plywood to the wood studs. On the section with no windows I followed the same process to go around the little metal braces. I did all this so my panels would be able to follow the wall curve and still be supported.

To address the pillars I cut pieces of plywood to fit the surface and screwed them in place, leaving the sides uncovered. All my panels are painted to match the van color.

On the lower C pillars I ran electric outlets and my battery monitor through them then boxed them in. The transition between the bulky bottom and the slim top is a little shelf.

In the end I like the look. I think it is "organic". I like the space, shudder to think of losing it.


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To address the pillars I cut pieces of plywood to fit the surface and screwed them in place, leaving the sides uncovered. All my panels are painted to match the van color.

On the lower C pillars I ran electric outlets and my battery monitor through them then boxed them in. The transition between the bulky bottom and the slim top is a little shelf.

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I'm aiming for a similar approach as yours and would love to see photos of your work, especially the coverings at the pillars and transition at pillars and horizontal up high.
 

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Hi,

You can see how I did the walls on my conversion in my build thread: http://www.promasterforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=27362
starting on page 10, or a little more detail here: http://www.buildagreenrv.com/our-conversion/our-conversion-paneling/

The biggest decision for me on the walls was whether to run the walls at the level of the main pillars, or to go with the level of the longerons, which would leave the pillars sticking out from the walls about an inch. I decided to go with putting the wall at the level of the longerons to gain a couple inches of width and to figure out a way to cover or dress up the pillars (that are not covered by the wall panels) later. Dressing up the pillars turns out to be more of a challenge than I thought, and I've pretty much decided I don't mind looking at the exposed pillars.

I ran the ceiling panels right on the surface of the ribs (no headroom loss), and this worked fine. But, the curvature of the ceiling near the walls is to tight for the hardboard panels I used to follow and I had to put a sort of furring strip (fairly thick) to fasten the ceiling panels here they meet the walls.
Also had to work out a way to support the ceiling at the front and back end -- I used wood strips screwed to the van metal (see pictures).

Gary
 

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I fretted over every half inch and am glad I did. Because we are relatively short, I did lower the ceiling 1" for extra insulation, but the walls are recessed from the ribs and follow the van's curve, which coincidentally is exactly the same curve as the ceiling. Like ananda, I color-matched my panels to the van so that exposed metal would blend, then covered only the front surfaces of the ribs. I understand that this exposed metal transfers heat/cold and thus compromises the wall insulation, but I've never had the need to nsulate my windows either.
 

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I’m on the road all day every day for a bit. I’ll post some photos when I can. I have a few already.







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The top picture is how I covered the wheel wells. Compound cuts on each piece to make the boxes hug the round shapes after I had applied sound deadening material. Then the small space left inside the boxes was stuffed with Thinsulate scraps. IICR 20° was the general angles on most cuts.


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I don’t have a “good” solution, but I did finish mine maximizing every fraction of an inch I could. There were many times I wondered of that was worth it.

I have windows. I cut 1x4 to go around them closely, and add some “studs”. I carefully scribed the outer skin onto the studs and shaped them to for the walls. Then I used 3M 5200 to adhere them to the walls. After insulation, I cut the panels to fit in between the big pillars, then screwed that 3mm plywood to the wood studs. On the section with no windows I followed the same process to go around the little metal braces. I did all this so my panels would be able to follow the wall curve and still be supported.

To address the pillars I cut pieces of plywood to fit the surface and screwed them in place, leaving the sides uncovered. All my panels are painted to match the van color.

On the lower C pillars I ran electric outlets and my battery monitor through them then boxed them in. The transition between the bulky bottom and the slim top is a little shelf.

In the end I like the look. I think it is "organic". I like the space, shudder to think of losing it.


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Do you have any more images of this? Any images of the completed section around the windows?

What about on the side with the 'little metal braces'-I'm curious to see the wall paneling going around these.

Thanks.
 

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I did half and half. Some walls (behind the couch) are full, but some are just 3M Insulate glued onto the metal and then covered with felt fabric. Then plywood above and below that. This gives me 4" extra inches of room behind the kitchen and on either side of the bed.

Behind the couch is the panel: https://goo.gl/L4ePa9

You can see in this pic on either side of the bed and behind the kitchen the extra room: https://goo.gl/DGhmfq
 

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I was thinking of welding (maybe...I don't have the van yet) some 1/8" x 2" metal strips to the side ribs.

The other thought I had was (since I was planning on having spray foam put on the walls, that if I just wedge some 2x4 pieces so that they are flush with the ribs...between the ribs... that might work as well and I won't lose any space there....Since closed cell foam is structural.

Thoughts.. comments?
 

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I did half and half. Some walls (behind the couch) are full, but some are just 3M Insulate glued onto the metal and then covered with felt fabric. Then plywood above and below that. This gives me 4" extra inches of room behind the kitchen and on either side of the bed.

Behind the couch is the panel: https://goo.gl/L4ePa9

You can see in this pic on either side of the bed and behind the kitchen the extra room: https://goo.gl/DGhmfq
@trhoppe - how did you attach the felt? It looks amazingly seamless in the pics. Do you have any close-ups of seams or corners? Also, what material (and size) did you use for that bed frame?
 
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