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Ordered 2022 Promaster 2500 159" WB High Roof
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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Hi. guys! Sorry to interrupt your thread, but -- @Lisa Harris you might want to read this thread and consider the Bluetti, with the Jackoby as a seperate unit for DC?
Not a problem @Lolaeliz . I actually briefly described my setup in @Lisa Harris Solar Panel thread, but not nearly in the detail in here.
 

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Ordered 2022 Promaster 2500 159" WB High Roof
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122 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Sounds like the plan is well thought through. I will be very interested in following your progress and thoughts once the van arrives and build starts in earnest!
Thanks. Went down a lot of rabbit holes before coming up with this approach. It's been tough trying to avoid tying myself in knots and overthinking everything time and again while waiting. Based on what everyone says, I expect I'll spend days just sitting in the van staring at walls once it comes in!
 

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2022 on order, Hightop 139" Rambl’n Ruby
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Hi. guys! Sorry to interrupt your thread, but -- @Lisa Harris you might want to read this thread and consider the Bluetti, with the Jackoby as a seperate unit for DC?
Thx so much. This has helped a lot. I do plan to start off with 180/200 solar panel. Would like to do it like a portable panel. Was thinking Bouge Rv panel 180/200 BB PANELS. I have looked at Bluette. Well I was trying to not buy the Blu… It’s so expensive. But I will do it.
 

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Premium Member
Ordered 2022 Promaster 2500 159" WB High Roof
Joined
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122 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
If I go with the bluette I have to figure out how to have it hooked up for solar and or shore power.
@Lisa Harris There are separate charging plugs for solar (DC) and for the AC charging brick on my AC 200P, which all I am comfortable commenting on. You can charge through either or both at the same time. One thing to keep in mind if you go with this unit is that the minimum voltage to start charging is 35 volts. Just check the Overcurrent Voltage (VOC) on the panels you are looking at. Usually (but not always) this means you will need at least 2 panels connected in series to get above the 35 volts minimum.

I can understand your frustration over this. Figuring out what to do for electric was one of the hardest things for me. So many other things are affected by it, especially if you want to add solar and car charging to the equation. Now all I need is a van to see how how my plan will work out!
 

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2014-159 HR in CT
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We often have a tendency to buy everything that we think we need, then discover that we may need something different than we thought!... buying-wise, pace yourself, and I would suggest that you not get too far ahead of the project.

I'll bet most of us have a list of items that we bought for the van and didn't use... I do! And some needed things won't be obvious until you start the build!

I spent the first few months sitting on a stool in my new empty Promaster with a clipboard full of paper and a tape measure! Of course, back then (2014) we didn't have the large number of users and ideas that are on the Promaster Forum now! But a few key players (who are still here) were there to bounce ideas off.

This week I spent a lot of time changing and redesigning things in the van...and I'm finally working on the ceiling panels that will finish the 7 year project (until the next idea comes along!)

Your first few trips in an unfinished van will help you create a to-do list.
 

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Premium Member
Ordered 2022 Promaster 2500 159" WB High Roof
Joined
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122 Posts
Discussion Starter · #29 ·
We often have a tendency to buy everything that we think we need, then discover that we may need something different than we thought!... buying-wise, pace yourself, and I would suggest that you not get too far ahead of the project.

I'll bet most of us have a list of items that we bought for the van and didn't use... I do! And some needed things won't be obvious until you start the build!

I spent the first few months sitting on a stool in my new empty Promaster with a clipboard full of paper and a tape measure! Of course, back then (2014) we didn't have the large number of users and ideas that are on the Promaster Forum now!

This week I spent a lot of time changing and redesigning things in the van...and I'm finally working on the ceiling panels that will finish the 7 year project (until the next idea comes along!)

Your first few trips in an unfinished van will help you create a to-do list.
Thanks for the reminder @proeddie . I am trying to stay disciplined to focus on what I will need for the things I will be working on first (to get to a state where the wife is willing to take those first trips!) I am focusing first on insulation & subfloor, basic electrical, basic framing, and heat/ventilation. After that we shall see. Hoping to take the first short trip in late summer/early fall. :)
 

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Premium Member
Ordered 2022 Promaster 2500 159" WB High Roof
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122 Posts
Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Got the first project on my build (mostly) done today. Installed 3/4 " XPS insulation, 19/32" plywood underlayment, and then re-installed the factory wood floor on top of that. Right now everything is "dry fitted" and I still need to go get longer M8-1.25 bolts to attach everything to the factory tie down points and seal the plywood subfloor. It looks like I will probably also have to use a router on the plywood subfloor if I want to re-use the plastic covers that came with the factory D-Rings.

The first step was to take up the factory wood floor. Getting it started was a little nerve wracking attacking a brand new van with a pry bar and wood shims. Once the first row of glue "pooped", I just used 3 2x4's and worked my way from back to front until I got to the slider. From there, it just took one 2x4 to get the rest of the way done. All of the glue stayed on the metal and the underside of the floor held up reasonably well. (I didn't bother trying to take up the glue, since the insulation would sit on top of it.) It was a little complicated getting the factory floor out of the van and definitely a 2+ person job. It is a single sheet a little over 3/8" thick so not too heavy, but cumbersome to move around, with a fair degree of flex over the 12' span. The first picture of the factory floor before taking it up.

On of the advantages of the factory floor is that it is a perfect template for laying out the sections insulation and sub-floor, including location of the factory tie down points. Basically, we laid out the three sheets of plywood laterally on the driveway and put the XPS insulation on top of that, ripping one sheet of insulation into 2 - 2' wide pieces so the seams of the insulation and subfloor did not overlap. After that it was just a matter of laying the factory floor on top, tracing the outline and the factory tie down holes, and cutting with the jig saw. (Note, at that point I was so excited to start cutting that I forgot to take pictures of laying everything out. Hopefully the description will help people if they want to try and replicate what I did.) I have to say, trying to find 3/4" XPS in stock in our local stores was a challenge. Ultimately, I settled for the "green stuff", instead of the Owens Corning "pink stuff" I have seen most people use. It was fine working with it and appeared to withstand pressure reasonably well. The second picture shows the insulation down.

The last step was repeating the process for the plywood subfloor. A little harder cutting with the jig saw, but overall not a problem. The last picture shows the subfloor laid out (with my little helper (grandson) inspecting). My "helpers" had to go so I didn't get a chance to take a picture with the factory subfloor on top of the sandwich.

Overall, I am please with how everything worked out. Started with a plan and just took it one step at a time. Much thanks to those on the Forum who suggested purchasing and re-using the factory wood floor. The laminate is heavy duty and adds strength to the overall package. Since it is one piece, it minimizes that need for worrying about seams in the subfloor and the top plastic "coin" layer seems durable enough that (at least for now) I am not going to worry about putting vinyl or laminate on top of that. Having an accurate template made it a piece of cake cutting everything out.

Now to finish this and move on to setting up the fixed bed area. It feels gratifying to finally take the first step (of many!)
 

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