Ram Promaster Forum banner

21 - 37 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
443 Posts
Growing up on a dirt road in a area that saw plenty of salt use, I quickly learned that steel through aluminum is a recipe for disaster. Every lug nut, hub or bolt I put on is going to have a thin coat of copper anti seize. Being stranded on the side of road with a flat tire and a rim that won't budge is probably one of the few experiences from my youth that I don't want to relive. =)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
728 Posts
I've never used anti seize before this van. I bought it used from Colorado and almost never got the front tires off. Impact couldn't get them off. A big breaker bar with a lot of pressure is the only thing that did it. Had I been on the side of the road I would have had to call a tow truck. Anti seize it is.

Sent from my SM-P900 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
538 Posts
OK, if the lug bolts for steel and alloy rims aren't the same. How am I supposed to use the spare tire on my van? I have the factory alloy wheels and a factory steel spare wheel under the van. I would think the lug bolts for alloys may be a bit longer as the alloy wheels are thicker there. Anyone know for sure?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,480 Posts
Just guessing but there are probably 5 bolts for the spare in your jack package (the black plastic box under the passenger seat).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,061 Posts
OK, if the lug bolts for steel and alloy rims aren't the same. How am I supposed to use the spare tire on my van? I have the factory alloy wheels and a factory steel spare wheel under the van. I would think the lug bolts for alloys may be a bit longer as the alloy wheels are thicker there. Anyone know for sure?
I have the alloy rims for the summer and steel for the winter. Use the same lug bolts with no problems, same for the spare.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
Discussion Starter #27
OK, if the lug bolts for steel and alloy rims aren't the same. How am I supposed to use the spare tire on my van? I have the factory alloy wheels and a factory steel spare wheel under the van. I would think the lug bolts for alloys may be a bit longer as the alloy wheels are thicker there. Anyone know for sure?
When I have my aluminum wheels on in the summer I just carry a set of the steel wheel lugs in the back with my pump and breaker bar. also as a note the heads are different sizes to so I also carry both sockets for my breaker bar.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I just bought a 3500 6 months ago, I had a **** of a time getting the wheel studs out. I used a breaker bar with a 4 foot pipe on the end, I got all wheels off except one, one wheel stud would not budge, I broke 4 breaker bars. I went to a tire shop to get all 4 tires replaced, the one wheel I couldn't get off, the tire guy hit the breaker bar at the socket with a big hammer and after a few attempts got it off with a pipe on the breaker as well. I wire brushed all the threads and anti seized the studs just to be safe for next time. This week I went to take the wheels off, and bolts were seized again, I broke my impact gun trying, I bought a new impact gun (750 ft/lb rated) and still wouldn't budge. A few big hits on the end of the socket and the new gun running 140 psi air pressure and I finally got them off. All threads were still clean not rusted, studs were torqued to 120 last time they were put on. In 30 years of working on cars, I've never seen this happen before. Usually a stud would break but these things are pretty beefy. This must me a common issue on these vans but I haven't found much on line. Anyone else have such a hard time?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,272 Posts
Other posters have mentioned it already but lubricated bolts need less torque. How much less? I've read as much as 25% less:


So when you last torqued them to 120 with lube, that might have over-tightened them making them hard to remove.

Not to steer anyone awry but I think the factory spec of 145 lbs is way high--for my use case (max weight 6300 lbs, nowhere near the theoretical max of 9000). And I'm not suggesting anyone else do this but shortly after I received my PM, I loosened all my bolts (just to make sure that I can do it when needed; i.e. I don't get caught off guard on a dark rainy highway) and retightened them to only 110 (to ensure that in future I can get them off). No lube though.

My Dodge minivan, same engine, is spec'ed to only 100. So I believe 110 is ok for the PM. (NB...it's my belief).
 
  • Like
Reactions: AdvRider

·
Registered
2019 118" Silver
Joined
·
729 Posts
Haven't had a problem removing the wheel bolts with a lug nut T-wrench. I don't use anti-seize but do torque to the specified 140 ft/lbs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
638 Posts
I have worked on old machinery all my life -- my "daily driver" tractor is a 58-year old 1962 Massey, the old truck is a 75-year old 1946 Chevrolet, the "new" truck is a fresh 51-year old 1969 Ford. Also, my son and I recently re-worked a 45-year old 1975 VW Bug. So for all of my mechanicing life, I have been using grease or anti-seize on any threaded fastener I mess with. I figure that some poor dumb SOB will have to take this fastener apart in another decade, so I want to do a favor to them by allowing the bolt to come out without breaking. Turns out that often that poor dumb SOB is me.

When I saw this video:


I went out and put anti-seize on all my lug bolts of our then-brand-new ProMaster van.

So I am definitely a proponent of putting anti-seize on any threaded fastener.

What I have learned from this thread: When using anti-seize I should reduce the torque by ~ 25%:

145 ft*lbs * 0.75 = 110 ft*lbs

So I'll use 110 ft*lbs and anti-seize on my ProMaster lug bolts from now on.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,272 Posts
It might be a good thing to check them periodically too (all of them). Make it a "pre-flight checklist" item before a long trip. --it's one of the easier things to do. For those with big freshwater tanks, it could take less time than filling them. :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Baxsie

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
All newly registered members MUST make an introductory post in the Introductory Post Forum as per forum rules. Promasterforum.com Introduction Section Please be aware until you do make the required introductory post any posts you make may be deleted.
I imagine this may be a bigger problem on aluminum wheels, look at the conical shape of the stud and how it wedges into the rim. I've run a metal brush inside the bolt holes to clean out the corrosion and wire wheeled the stud threads,(threads were still clean from last time but anti seize was mostly gone) and conical heads and greased both up and torqued to 100ft/lbs. I will carry a torque wrench with me and check often and also check after a short while if they're easily removable. Thanks for the replies on this. If this works out,I will do the same to the other 3 wheels.


Sent from my EML-L09 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
I've only had European cars prior to the van, and they all had conical lugs. I always put antisieze on the threads and the back plate, and then just hand tighten them up. The water and salt of the winter rust things up, so I just do it as a precaution. Before I go on a longer trip, I do a once over on the lugs. Usually they never actually need any tightening.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
I think all modern lugs are tapered. They need to have this feature to self center on the holes in the rims. The degree of taper will vary for different lugs, but they are all tapered on my Hondas and so on. I always use a light coating of bearing grease on the threaded portion of the assembly and also on the mating surface with the hub before I put my wheels back on. I have never had any issue removing the lugs or the wheels from the hubs when I do this.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,272 Posts
I've lately been applying vaseline to the brake rotors (discs) of my minivan, where they mate with the wheel. I've had it happen a few times where the wheel and rotor have rusted together. In two instances, no amount of pulling or kicking would get it off.

69038


I had to put the lug nuts loosely back onto the studs, lower the minivan onto the road and drive back and forth, slamming the brakes each time to break the bond. And this happens over the span of just the winter because I have 2 sets of tires and rims for, winter and summer. i.e., it doesn't need years to develop. I'm guessing it's salt.

I don't drive the PM in the winter and so hopefully this doesn't happen with it.
 
21 - 37 of 37 Posts
Top