Ram Promaster Forum banner

1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So for years I have used anti seize or lube on my lug nuts without issue. It seems to be 50/50 some love it and some fear it. So for those that do their own maintenance on there van who uses lube on the lug bolts and whos dead set against it. Curious to see what others do. I already had one tire shop strip out a lug bolt as it seems they are a PIA to get started and if you try to start them with the impact gun your just asking for problems.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,777 Posts
Just rotated my tires myself and I had NO problem with the lug nuts. Only an idiot would cross thread one! That being said I like the american system where the stud is on the hub and the wheel is held on with nuts. No lube or anti seize unless the wheel and studs are exposed to salt. I always anti-siezed the studs or lugs when I was driving in New England winters. If not a big cheater bar was called for and the stud would snap right off! DAMHIK Note that lubing them changes the torque required to be safe but I don’t recall how. I use the old fashioned system- tight enough so I can get them off but too tight for wimps and ladies to remove them. Don’t get me wrong WOMEN will still be able to get them off as thats about how strong I have become!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
752 Posts
For steel wheels the factory says 146 ft/lb (198Nm) torque - Also states "Never use oil or grease on studs or wheel mounting (lug) bolts" and I believe them.

That said... Industry spec for Grade 12 M16 x 1.5 mm bolt... lubricated 130 ft/lb, dry zinc plated 147 ft/lb, plain & dry 174 ft/lb (Fastenal FEDS).

PM lug bolts started out zinc plated so wet torque is ~10% reduction in tightening force to stretch the bolt the same amount to achieve 18,880lbs clamping force.

Might be fine if you're all attention to detail and forever doing it yourself, but a stranger repairing a flat tire or kid on a service line doing tires miss that they're lubed and you've instantly distorted the rim or worse.

I won't say 146 ft/lb comes easy but the first thing I added to the PM was a 30" breaker bar in case they want to bind.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,452 Posts
I always use anti-seize on my lug bolts. Never ever have any problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I am from PA and the salt plays **** on lugs and for this reason I have always used anti seize and never had a problem. And yes some idiot kid at the tire shop striped the threads right off one of my lug bolts. luckily I was able to clean up the hub with a tap and had no thread damage there. And please name me a tire shop that puts a torque wrench to the lugs or looks for the spec for a vehicle? I know I have never put a torque wrench to lugs in my life and never had a problem. And I also just picked up a 24" breaker bar with a 13/16 and 3/4 impact socket. I have the 3/4 cause my new wheels use different lug bolts so now I have to keep 5 of the steel wheel lug bolts in the van also incase of a flat. seems to be 50/50 here also and if I lived in the south and didn't need it I probably wouldn't use it but its almost a must in the salt belt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
TA truckstops lube the studs and hand torque the big rig wheels to 450-500 ft.lbs. they also re-torque for free within a certain time frame.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
Yes, Anit Sieze woks. Just use very lightly and always a torque wrench, no air tools for tightening. Stripped lug bolts are simply from bad install/installers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
When I'm doing my own tires (rotating and such), I put a light coating of high drop temp grease (JT6) on the threads. I keep my vehicles in excess of 15 years and we have a lot of salt here. I get my new tires put on at Fleet Farm (Midwest store) and they hand torque every nut with a torque wrench and it has to be signed off on. They will also retorque for free after 100 miles. It is really pretty simple to tighten up the nuts and then finish everything with a torque wrench. When the fastener is lubed, less force (torque) is needed to get the equivalent clamping force, so you can back off ~ 10 ft lbs on the wrench as compared to the dry spec and you will be fine. In the end, as long as you don't exceed the elastic limit on the bolt, there are no issues in regards to over tightening it (other than it can get tough to remove).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
I have the 3/4 cause my new wheels use different lug bolts so now I have to keep 5 of the steel wheel lug bolts in the van also incase of a flat. seems to be 50/50 here also and if I lived in the south and didn't need it I probably wouldn't use it but its almost a must in the salt belt.
Do the stock steel wheels and the optional aluminum wheels use the same lug bolts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
Ok, so we have lug "bolts" like a BMW or VW usually has? I haven't had a wheel off yet and I'm not home to pull one off. Using lug bolts allows easy use if you wanted to use some small hubcentric spacers to fill the wheel wells a bit so that's why I'm wondering. I don't think I love any aftermarket wheels thatuch and my black sprayed steel wheels look good to me so far, but could be spaced out a bit. I've used quality hubcentric spacers and longer studs/lug bolts on several cars in the past.

Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
517 Posts
Lug bolts don't require any lub or anti seize. But as long as you don't use to much it won't be a problem. I work on cars for a living, no professional that I've ever met lubricates lug bolts. Not sure about heavy equipment or big rig mechanics. And that wouldn't help the monkey down at the tire shop not cross thread anything, or over tourqe them. It could give false tourqe readings.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,777 Posts
All that is true but living for 55 years in the heavily salted NE-Kingdom of Vermont taught me (and every professional mechanic I met there) there are two ways to get lug nuts off after a couple of years- treat them with anti-sieze before or with an acetylene torch. Yes it does mess with the torque setting.
 
  • Like
Reactions: keeponvaning

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
I have 2 wheel bolts that won't come out, and one of them broke a snap on impact socket and still would not come out. The second broke in half with the treads still in, looks like I am ordering a hub, and going to put on anti-seize. I had the dealer that sold me the van install new tires for free 6 months ago. :(There are not a ram dealer, and I decided months ago that I won't ever go back.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,061 Posts
I always use anti-seize on mine. Did not for the first year and it was bad. Also on the back of rim where it meets the hub.
Had the van now for 4.5 years and there is no problem. I have the aluminum wheels.
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top