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2014 136” HR
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Discussion Starter #1
I started applying Dynamat today--25% coverage. After applying the Dynamat to the centers of the roof sections, I tapped around with a stick. I discovered that the outsides of the panels were still quite live. I applied one 2.5" x 18" piece to the outside "recess" in the second panel from the front (above the door). The effect was dramatic not only on that side of that section, but also on that side of all three other sections. I ended up adding similar pieces to both sides of all sections.

Now I want it to rain so I can listen. :laugh:

BTW, I got 36 sqft for about $145 on Amazon. It is very easy to apply and I cannot smell it at all. Because the surface is essentially flat, I can use the edge of a short piece of wood to press it in place instead of buying the roller.
 

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I used a similar product (Resisto) on the inside wheel covers. works real good for sound proofing.

Dynamat is more expensive, but I think it's worth it: they use butyl, a composite that is more heat resistant that Resisto, that is asphalt based. Some people that used Resisto complained that it melted and smelled under extreme heat. Personally, I didn't experience that this summer.I think that I would feel safe using Resisto on the side panels that don't get that hot, but I would use for sure Dynamat on the roof top.

I used cork sheet for my roof top, works pretty good, but I think it's not as effective as Dynamat. But it has the same potential problem: it is glued on the surface, so not that easy to remove in case body work is needed. It's not likely that the roof top would ever need body work, unless a stupid guy walks on the roof while installing a solar panel, but I am hesitant for the side panels.

I still have a few months to figure out what's best for side panels. On my first try, I used mineral wool (Roxul) one of the worst mistake of my life (it's still itching ;) ).
 

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I was considering using Roxul behind my Pendaform wall panels. Other that the itching, are you satisfied with the results and how did you attach it. Thanks.
 

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I was considering using Roxul behind my Pendaform wall panels. Other that the itching, are you satisfied with the results and how did you attach it. Thanks.
I removed all of it after a week and I am very glad I did.

Roxul is probably good in a house, but forget it for a van. It's crumby, so with the vibrations in a van, you'll end up with micro-particles floating in the air. Not sure you want to breathe that

It's a relatively new product in North-America, but volcanic rock wool has been used for quite a while in Europe and I have read some concerns about it.
 

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Thanks Guy, good point about being crumbly. Could possibly fall apart over time. I have used it for patching penetrations in new construction as fire stop and it is crumbly as you say.
 

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MsNomer, Are you just doing the ceiling, or walls too?
GuyT, Did you cover the ceiling completely with the cork?

My plan is to cover the wheel wells and lower wall with thinsulate, for the road noise, only foam on the upper walls & roof. Am I going to regret that? Will the pitter patter of rain turn into an obnoxious drumming?
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Papal, your plan is the same as my plan until I started messing with this #%}€¥ foam board. Thinsulate is a no-brainer below the belt line.

I can already testify that the Dynamat helps noticeably with rain noise. What's left is actually pleasant even with no other insulation up there.
 

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GuyT, Did you cover the ceiling completely with the cork?
I did the cargo area. Also used reflectix bubble aluminum paper.

A general remark on sound proofing: no matter how much effort one puts in on sound proofing, windows and, in my case, a opened fan vent let a lot of noise in, so it's useless to try to get 100% sound proofing.
 

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Diesel PM, 2015, 2500 hi-top
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I've got 40 sq ft of Second Skin Vibration dampener (CLD) and will be doing what you're doing, but not sure where would be the best use of this expensive stuff?? Will use it on the rear wheel wells for sure, but where else is it exceptionally noisy? Under the hood? on the cargo walls? cargo ceiling? Cab area? The cargo floor will be covered with horse mats, 3/4" thick rubber, diamond non-slip pattern, which I think will solve road noise? so using this expensive stuff on the floor under the horse mat probably wouldn't be a good idea. I guess my true question is, "Where is the noisiest 40 square feet in the ProMaster?"
 

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I've got 40 sq ft of Second Skin Vibration dampener (CLD) and will be doing what you're doing, but not sure where would be the best use of this expensive stuff?? Will use it on the rear wheel wells for sure, but where else is it exceptionally noisy? Under the hood? on the cargo walls? cargo ceiling? Cab area? The cargo floor will be covered with horse mats, 3/4" thick rubber, diamond non-slip pattern, which I think will solve road noise? so using this expensive stuff on the floor under the horse mat probably wouldn't be a good idea. I guess my true question is, "Where is the noisiest 40 square feet in the ProMaster?"

40 sq. ft. Will get you started... (I have a 118" WB)

Use it on the wheel wells, makes a BIG difference there. I bought 40 sq. ft. of the Damplifier pro just for that. Covered them completely as they made a lot of noise.

The Damplifier (regular) went on all the wall panels, covering 25% of each. Another big difference.

I took of the plastic door panels and added some in there too. Did what I could working around everything inside. The added weight of the damplifier added some heft to the doors making them close a bit easier too.

Also the ceiling, in strips 2" wide, doing all the ridges in each panel section. Probably more than 25% but it's how it worked out.

Still have some for the front doors and under headliner but saving that for warmer weather in the Spring. It's easier to apply it when it warm/softer. Roll it on really well.
 

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Just the rear doors and slider. I'll do the front doors in the Spring.

Hood? Personally it think quieting the cargo area comes first. Lots of noise there. If you want to quiet the engine camparment the firewall will do more to decrease engine noise inside the van. That will be a lot of work removing things to get to it. The hoods so small I don't consider it an issue. Maybe after everything else is quoted inside.
 

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Damper mat can create noise elsewhere

I added mat to rear doors trying to create a higher quality sound when slamming door. It added a lot of weight and actually "increased" the noise. So I looked at door, thought to myself why, then notice tiny area at top of door, thru small opening, where I could stick another damper. I added it there and door went quiet.

If you look at what Ford engineers did on transit, they placed one square foot mat in the middle of each panel. Not complete coverage. You're trying to stop resonance vibration noise.

I covered wheel humps completely and did small pieces in the middle of all wall panels. Then insulated.

Can't say for sure my way is right, but it's lighter and doesn't break the bank.
 

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Diesel PM, 2015, 2500 hi-top
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Research says there's alot of different stuff out there! and lots of materials are wasted and used incorrectly. I found this link below which explains the different products for sound deadening and how they work, which was an eye opener for me. For example, using CLDs only on flat metal places and being cost effective with as little as 25 percent coverage in a patchwork pattern, etc. Maybe you'll all find this info interesting too .. . . .
http://www.cumminsforum.com/forum/94-98-engine/576543-ideas-consider-when-soundproofing-your-truck.html
 

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You guys should check out carinsulation.com , I've ordered several times from them and highly recommend their product. Worked great for me and a lot cheaper then dynamat or peel and seal garbage.
 

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You guys should check out carinsulation.com , I've ordered several times from them and highly recommend their product. Worked great for me and a lot cheaper then dynamat or peel and seal garbage.
Do you work there or something? This is just Low-e www.low-e.com that several retailers are selling under their own name (i.e. EZ Cool). No need to keep promoting it as some revolutionary new product. It's a tiny layer of closed cell foam with aluminum facings. It's not a replacement for dynamat or any other butyl sound deadener. It needs an air space to reach any additional R-Value over what the CCF provides.
 

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You guys should check out carinsulation.com , I've ordered several times from them and highly recommend their product. Worked great for me and a lot cheaper then dynamat or peel and seal garbage.
Different application and purpose than dynamat...

Nice product if installed correctly but sounds like you left no airgap so the foil faces effectively don't do much for you. 3m 77 glue might not hold it in in high temp situations... At least if it falls on a hot day it won't break like humpy dumpty did... Should have used the 3m 90, a better product for your use.

More reading this forum and less bragging/mocking what others have done may have served you a better use of your time and money... :(
 

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Different application and purpose than dynamat...

Nice product if installed correctly but sounds like you left no airgap so the foil faces effectively don't do much for you. 3m 77 glue might not hold it in in high temp situations... At least if it falls on a hot day it won't break like humpy dumpty did... Should have used the 3m 90, a better product for your use.

More reading this forum and less bragging/mocking what others have done may have served you a better use of your time and money... :(
Actually I did use 3m 90, I just checked my can lol. I cut strips to create an air gap in most areas. Where did I mock anyone or brag? Peel and seal is garbage, it's asphalt and shouldn't be installed in a confined space. Read the MSDS on it, it's also very heavy. I'm a cheap penny pincher, I don't need an extra ~100lbs in my vehicles forever. Car insulation is cheaper then dynamat and peel and seal and I'm very happy with it. It's a free discussion forum, I can't suggest something I used and had good results with?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Sound Proofing Results So Far

So far, I have:

About 25% Dynamat on all panels that were exposed originally--no door panels removed yet.

Thinsulate in ceiling, rear upper panels, rear lower panels and a thick gob of it in the wheel well enclosures.

Three full-size uncovered windows.

Floor consisting of Mopar rubber mat, Silent Blue underlayment with Mylar removed, and 1/2" marine ply covered with Marmoleum, all attached to vehicle at tie-down points.

The panel behind the driver is still empty floor to ceiling. The rib in the door's window panel has been removed, but no window yet (and no Dynamat because it will get a window), so it vibrates like crazy.

I have not done Guy's measurement, but I have compared this noise level to that of my Corolla (which I consider quiet) by holding my iPhone in my hand as I drive on city streets, some of which are noisy brick.

I am happy to report that the van is quieter than the Corolla by as much as 5 db. No more than about 8 db above ambient noise when stopped at a light. It's interesting to finally be able to hear the engine.

It will be several months before I get to test it on the highway.
 
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