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2021 1500 136"WB High top
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Yaaaaay! So exciting. Deadlines always make things go faster. I can't wait to see it finished.

The cutout for your sink is so perfect! any tips on how you did that?
 

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Discussion Starter · #342 ·
Yaaaaay! So exciting. Deadlines always make things go faster. I can't wait to see it finished.

The cutout for your sink is so perfect! any tips on how you did that?
Traced the sink, measured the sink flange, offset the trace by a bit less than the sink flange, drilled holes on each side, and then very very slow careful cutting with a jigsaw. It's not PERFECT, but close enough for me and I'm a somewhat of a perfectionist.

I'm terrible with deadlines. I don't have a good "feel" for the future, and deadlines don't seem real until the last minute, at which time I end up scrambling like mad. Back in college I'd do that all the time. Then I realized the projects always magically get done by the deadline and I ended up putting one off a bit too long. No magic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #343 ·
The cut was tough because teak is VERY hard and oily, and my jigsaw is really cheap, and blade doesn't like to stay straight on either axis. So the cut edge is slightly angled, which made it difficult to meet up the bottom of the cuts, but the top surface is the one that matters most anyway.

Actually, it was harder to cut the faucet hole. I used a hole saw, but that gets very hot and slow because there's nowhere for the heat to dissipate. I think a forstner bit would have been better. Then the hole turned out slightly too small, but I was able to use a trim blade on the hand router to slowly take off a bit until the faucet fit. Make sure to drill top down because even teak can splinter out the bottom.
 

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2021 1500 136"WB High top
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Traced the sink, measured the sink flange, offset the trace by a bit less than the sink flange, drilled holes on each side, and then very very slow careful cutting with a jigsaw. It's not PERFECT, but close enough for me and I'm a somewhat of a perfectionist.
The "Very very slowly" with the jigsaw is the part where my confidence lags. My sink came with a cardboard cutting pattern. The sink sits in its place so tightly, I have to really measure and measure again.

I'm terrible with deadlines. I don't have a good "feel" for the future, and deadlines don't seem real until the last minute, at which time I end up scrambling like mad. Back in college I'd do that all the time. Then I realized the projects always magically get done by the deadline and I ended up putting one off a bit too long. No magic.
The thing that helps with a deadline isa to do list with basically daily deadlines. Not that they always get met, but it definitely helps. And it then allows for the last minute magic.
 

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2021 1500 136"WB High top
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581 Posts
The cut was tough because teak is VERY hard and oily, and my jigsaw is really cheap, and blade doesn't like to stay straight on either axis. So the cut edge is slightly angled, which made it difficult to meet up the bottom of the cuts, but the top surface is the one that matters most anyway.

Actually, it was harder to cut the faucet hole. I used a hole saw, but that gets very hot and slow because there's nowhere for the heat to dissipate. I think a forstner bit would have been better. Then the hole turned out slightly too small, but I was able to use a trim blade on the hand router to slowly take off a bit until the faucet fit. Make sure to drill top down because even teak can splinter out the bottom.
The cut was tough because teak is VERY hard and oily, and my jigsaw is really cheap, and blade doesn't like to stay straight on either axis. So the cut edge is slightly angled, which made it difficult to meet up the bottom of the cuts, but the top surface is the one that matters most anyway.

Actually, it was harder to cut the faucet hole. I used a hole saw, but that gets very hot and slow because there's nowhere for the heat to dissipate. I think a forstner bit would have been better. Then the hole turned out slightly too small, but I was able to use a trim blade on the hand router to slowly take off a bit until the faucet fit. Make sure to drill top down because even teak can splinter out the bottom.
I was thinking of dropping a circular saw on the 4 long sides, then using the jigsaw for the curved corners. Then some videos showed people doing it with a router, building a frame to follow with the router... but I can't even see how that would work because how will a router cut one inch deep? I'll be conquering it this weekend. I'm going to play around with the scrap pieces and see what I can do best.

I was gonna use a spade drill bit for the faucet and soap dispenser. Do you think that will work?

I'm using acacia wood. I don't k now how that rates in hardness.
 

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Discussion Starter · #347 ·
Got a lot more done in the past few weeks. Will add each thing in its own post.

A few weeks ago I installed LVP flooring. Wife and I picked it out together from what was in stock at Home Depot and Lowe's. Ended up with Blue Ridge Pine from Lowe's. I was looking for 5mm. This is 7mm but still fits and drawers still open. Took all day to install, mostly planning, thinking, measuring. Got aluminum angle for stairs at Ace for the edges, not shown. Glued and screwed to the edge of the subfloor. Looks 10 times better with the floor done!

77352


77353
 

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Discussion Starter · #348 ·
I mostly finished building the footrest / subwoofers.

Used MDF because that's what people typically use for subwoofers for rigidity. Plywood probably would be fine but I felt like trying out a new material. Only had space to use 1/2", so added stiffeners inside. JL Audio recommends 0.65 cubic feet for a sealed box so that's what it is, factoring in speaker and stiffener displacement.

77354


This is the center box between the two 10" subwoofers. The middle is double hinged to fit between the seats when it opens. The front opens as well because my fridge slides right in front of this box and that's where the fridge controls are located:
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Looking backwards with the center box open and fridge open. Controls accessible.
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Used 3M90 to glue speaker carpet to the sub boxes:
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Installed these connectors in the back of each box for speaker wire:
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Subs built!
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In order to connect to the dash stereo, I bought these MateNLok pin connectors off eBay. Crimped with a special tool bought on Amazon. Super easy and perfect crimps. Plugged into the ignition feed and rear speaker feeds at the lower passenger B pillar.
77360


Box and subs set in place. The driver side is standing on end and aims toward the wall:
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Rear speaker wires connect to line out converter which is turned on by ignition feed. Then line out is wired to a source selector that will default to house stereo, but switches to cab head unit when it senses signal. That is wired to a JBL 400 watt mono sub amp with 2 outputs, one for each sub.
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Driver side sub leaves room for fridge to vent:
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More photos next post...
 

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Discussion Starter · #349 ·
Used leftover leather from the C pillar covers to make a handle for the box:
77364


To secure the box without screwing through the flooring, I carpeted a strip of plywood, bolted to the top of the cab step with rivnuts and screwed to a 2x2 strip I glued to the box.
77365


Ran some 4 gauge wire to the countertop for distribution to stereo systems and power amps and house stereo:
77366


Wiring ready for the house stereo. Just waiting on speakers to wire up and slap in the receiver and cover. The cover will be held on with aluminum angle bolted to T nuts, similar to the C pillar covers.
77367


Next, cab sound upgrade...
 

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Discussion Starter · #350 · (Edited)
Well, the subs sounded awesome, but left the rest sounding horrible. And there was no smooth transition between mids and bass. Planned to just swap door speakers, but ended up getting a component set powered by mini full range mono amps in the doors.

Removed A pillar covers and door panel. A pillar just pops off, plus there's a little clip inside you have to reach in and unclip. Door panel had several torx bolts and several PZ screws. Not too bad, just have to remember how to put it back together.
77368


Spent quite a while cutting and squishing kilmat into the door as best I could. I rolled some parts, and just finger pressed others.
77369


Made these covers for the holes on the upper half of the door out of 5mm plywood with kilmat stuck to it. Screwed them on. The lower half plastic cover is too close to fit stuff behind it.
77370


VHB and screws to secure the crossover and mini 60W amplifier to the panel. There is a void under the plastic trim at this location. Amp is grounded to the metal bracket at the interior door handle.
77371


No photos of A pillars. Fishing the wire from the door to the A pillars was actually really easy. Just stuck 12 gauge wire down from the top, and reached in where the door boot is connected and grabbed it. Taped it to speaker wire and pulled it through. The new tweeters were very slightly bigger but kinda snapped in where the old ones were. They felt secure so I just went with it.

Set tweeters to -3db at the crossovers, and the mini amps have their own filter that I set to 80 Hz. Still have to dial in the sub amp crossover but sounding really good already and the mids and bass blend much better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #351 ·
Most recently I built and installed drawers for bikes and stuff in the garage, and added shelves over the head and foot of the bed.

Broke out the hand router for one last project. It's really tough to get the fence clamped well on such skinny pieces:
77372


Gluing up the storage drawer. I used 1/2" ply for most everything on the build, but used 3/4" for the sides to get solid bite for the screws on the long drawer slides. Also used 3/4" for the base of the bike drawer - more secure fork mount.
77373


Since I have 2 trays side by side, I had to route out a spot on the support pieces to inset the brackets so the drawer slides can sit flush. Some elaborate fences here:
77374


77375


Both slides work! A bit stiff since I couldn't really adjust anything, but fine.
77376


77377
 

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Discussion Starter · #352 ·
These shelves were strangely a huge PITA. Much harder that the upper cabinets. Used 1x6 birch, ripped at an angle, and glued together. I initially thought clamping would be difficult so I tried to glue and screw. That came out so bad with such a huge gap that I was able to unscrew and pry/cut it back apart and just glue it. Filled the screw holes and painted over everything. Polyurethane inside.

The end pieces at the back also took forever to figure out. I initially wanted them to angle up at the same angle as the shelves, but they would not hit the area over the rear doors nicely so settled on this.

Figuring out how to get them mounted was also tough. Ended up predrilling the shelf bottom for 5 screws, starting the screws, predrilling the ends at a slight angle, starting those screws, then my wife held it up while I got one end lined up and screwed, then the other, then adjusted the angle, screwed the ends, etc. Turned out pretty cool though!

77378


77379


77380


77381


Screwed the front end from inside the upper cabinets. Very careful measuring to line up the screws.
77382
 

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Beautiful work. I need to unsee that photo of the handle between the seats, though. I think I would catch my foot on it every time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #354 ·
Beautiful work. I need to unsee that photo of the handle between the seats, though. I think I would catch my foot on it every time.
I don't think I'd catch on it. I don't love having it there but I have to have some way to open it ¯\(ツ)
 

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Discussion Starter · #356 ·
Looking real good! If you ever get annoyed with that handle, there are plenty of recessed handle options out there.
Recessed! So simple, didn't even think of it. The handle was just a whim - had the leather so just made it up and didn't overthink it. I don't shuffle even on level ground, there's about 1 in a million chance I'd ever shuffle over a step like that enough to trip. However, I am concerned with it just wearing out from being stepped on and getting ugly.

That whole box is kinda cool and has a useful purpose, but it's not my best work.
1) Carpet can quickly get gross,
2) I measured for the fridge drawer to have 1/4" clearance to open, but adding the carpet brings it so close that the fridge can catch on the glued edge of the vertical lip of the lid. I didn't fold the carpet around the edge of the lid because I didn't want to carefully shave off that 1/8" (getting lazy). So I may have to re-finish it after a while anyway. I think polyurethane over paint would have been a better choice for the center part. The cat is almost sure to use it as his personal scratching post, so maybe it's ok that it's not my best work lol.
3) That speaker by the door had to get pulled back an extra inch or so because I didn't realize the plastic trim bulges out. So it kinda sticks into the doorway a bit far. If I wasn't running out of steam and time, I'd probably ditch the stupid space-wasting trim and figure out a custom solution. There's several inches of nothing in there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #357 ·
Bought a redwood slab down the block:
77601


Cut, sanded, and placed in a bin:
77602


Put various wood blocks underneath and leveled it:
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Measured out two part epoxy resin and hardener:
77604


Popping bubbles with a lighter:
77605


After a second coat on the end grain and poly on the bottom, got a nice tabletop for the Lagun:
77606


77607
 

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Used low mile 2018 159
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These shelves were strangely a huge PITA. Much harder that the upper cabinets. Used 1x6 birch, ripped at an angle, and glued together. I initially thought clamping would be difficult so I tried to glue and screw. That came out so bad with such a huge gap that I was able to unscrew and pry/cut it back apart and just glue it. Filled the screw holes and painted over everything. Polyurethane inside.

The end pieces at the back also took forever to figure out. I initially wanted them to angle up at the same angle as the shelves, but they would not hit the area over the rear doors nicely so settled on this.

Figuring out how to get them mounted was also tough. Ended up predrilling the shelf bottom for 5 screws, starting the screws, predrilling the ends at a slight angle, starting those screws, then my wife held it up while I got one end lined up and screwed, then the other, then adjusted the angle, screwed the ends, etc. Turned out pretty cool though!

View attachment 77378

View attachment 77379

View attachment 77380

View attachment 77381

Screwed the front end from inside the upper cabinets. Very careful measuring to line up the screws.
View attachment 77382
Very nice work
These shelves were strangely a huge PITA. Much harder that the upper cabinets. Used 1x6 birch, ripped at an angle, and glued together. I initially thought clamping would be difficult so I tried to glue and screw. That came out so bad with such a huge gap that I was able to unscrew and pry/cut it back apart and just glue it. Filled the screw holes and painted over everything. Polyurethane inside.

The end pieces at the back also took forever to figure out. I initially wanted them to angle up at the same angle as the shelves, but they would not hit the area over the rear doors nicely so settled on this.

Figuring out how to get them mounted was also tough. Ended up predrilling the shelf bottom for 5 screws, starting the screws, predrilling the ends at a slight angle, starting those screws, then my wife held it up while I got one end lined up and screwed, then the other, then adjusted the angle, screwed the ends, etc. Turned out pretty cool though!

View attachment 77378

View attachment 77379

View attachment 77380

View attachment 77381

Screwed the front end from inside the upper cabinets. Very careful measuring to line up the screws.
View attachment 77382
Good work Aaronmcd.

Rear door panel. What material did you use?
For the box above the rear doors I made a 1/2" ply box, thinking of 1/8" for door panel but interested in know what you did as it looks great. By the way, your color schemes are in line with what we started with except bedroom walls will be foam backed vinyl. In green as you did.

Good job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #359 ·
Very nice work

Good work Aaronmcd.

Rear door panel. What material did you use?
For the box above the rear doors I made a 1/2" ply box, thinking of 1/8" for door panel but interested in know what you did as it looks great. By the way, your color schemes are in line with what we started with except bedroom walls will be foam backed vinyl. In green as you did.

Good job.
I used 5mm plywood from Lowe's for all the wall paneling. I used rivnuts on the rear doors in case I want to hang anything off them. The lower half of the doors aren't covered yet, I used leftover pieces and didn't want to go buy an entire 4x8 sheet for each door.

Back door panels, bed shelves, and lower cabinets are painted "Forest Green" a Benjamin Moore color in Ace Hardware paint. I've been buying everything I can at Ace because it's a few blocks away and the guys there are extremely helpful.
 

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Good choice, 5mm. In-between 1/8" and 1/4" just right.
We like Forest Green but it will be a tad lighter Forest Green in vinyl for bed area since it has no windows by design.

Agree the ACE folks are super helpful. Best part is that they are a small business and need our support.
 
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