Ram Promaster Forum banner

261 - 280 of 293 Posts

·
Registered
2017 - 2500 159
Joined
·
898 Posts
Discussion Starter · #262 ·
One way valves should have a flow direction arrow on them.
They do. I hadn't heard of such a thing and they weren't advertised as such so I didn't think it was a thing. I thought all ball valves go either way. I googled around and it seems there is such a thing as a directional ball valve, but I can't find what the use is for such a thing. What's the benefit of having water able to flow backwards through a closed valve?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
613 Posts
I was talking about when in use for gas, but the opposite. They only allow pressure one way, whether opened or closed. Allowing any exchange while closed seems like a waste of a valve. I've always just assembled special connections from the legos at the store. You've reaffirmed my opinion that speciality hardware would be a nightmare

Edit: On the other hand, used in a pressurized system, it would never 'flow backwards' though. Perhaps it's to assist in draining something if it's frequently unpressurized. I'm just guessing
 

·
Registered
2017 - 2500 159
Joined
·
898 Posts
Discussion Starter · #266 ·
I was talking about when in use for gas, but the opposite. They only allow pressure one way, whether opened or closed. Allowing any exchange while closed seems like a waste of a valve. I've always just assembled special connections from the legos at the store. You've reaffirmed my opinion that speciality hardware would be a nightmare

Edit: On the other hand, used in a pressurized system, it would never 'flow backwards' though. Perhaps it's to assist in draining something if it's frequently unpressurized. I'm just guessing
Yeah, it wouldn't flow backwards. I examined to valve - it looks like the ball is a T valve ball, so perhaps pressure on the convex side can push it out of the way, but pressure on the concave side pushes in into the seat. No idea why it's designed like this, unless to use the same ball for various valves. It's not a v port control valve.
 

·
Registered
2017 - 2500 159
Joined
·
898 Posts
Discussion Starter · #267 ·
I've been working on the water and propane systems.

Water is far and away the hardest thing on the build. People seem to be afraid of electrical, but electrical connections seem to be more standardized, and water tries it's damnedest to escape, while electrons prefer to follow the path you make for them.

I made several orders for Flair-It fittings, several PVC threaded fittings, and some re orders, and even a random sharkbite push to connect fitting. One really annoying thing is retailers not specifying threads properly. I found straight threads are often advertised as NPT. I also discovered straight to NPT seems to work with Teflon tape, but straight to straight will leak. By far the easiest are swivel fittings with a gasket. Swivel fittings are also very useful for removing portions of the piping to re-do stuff.

I even had a leaking compression fitting factory installed on the water heater. All in all, plumbing is a veritable nightmare. Here is the final piping after all leaks were fixed and water heater is working. I'm using an aquajet variable speed pump:
73822


Bought a flaring tool and flare nuts for the gas lines. Also bought a spring-style copper pipe bender. All in all, running the gas lines was fairly easy. The one difficulty is that the flare nuts and flaring tool take a lot of space, so I can't put fittings super close to each other. This made it difficult to get the side line to the Propex installed.

Here is the flaring tool:
73824


I cut the pipe with a jigsaw, which worked alright. Easy enough that I'm glad I didn't bother buying a specialized pipe cutter. Just used a handheld orbital sander to smooth out the cut end. Here's how the flare looks:
73825


This photo shows how tight it is trying to get fittings close to each other. The tee fitting is as close to the bulkhead as is possible, forcing me to do an "s" shape, which required very tight bends, while leaving enough straight pipe at the ends for the flare and flare nuts, and space for the valve. Turned out I had JUST enough space, to the 1/8" to get this done in 10 inches:
73826


Ran a pipe up the back of the oven space. Used a swivel 90 fitting to connect to the oven:
73827


Painted the cabinet, installed Propex vents, and covered the Propex with removable panels:
73828


Put in the oven!
73829


73830


73831


Oh, also, a pump switch is really handy when setting up the pump, and turning it off when away from the van. Installed it under the sink location right next to the pump:
73832


Super excited for the major systems to be done next weekend after I get the sink, faucet, and water filter installed!
 

·
Registered
2017 - 2500 159
Joined
·
898 Posts
Discussion Starter · #268 ·
One more thing:
No one seems to give a good option for going through the floor with penetrations. What I found works, after hours and hours of thinking and staring at fittings and asking around at the hardware store:

Use a PVC nipple fitting. They come in various lengths and diameters with threads on both ends. Use an electrical conduit nut on the top. Nipple goes through the drilled holes, conduit nut stops it from dropping out the bottom. Seal however you wish.
 

·
Registered
2017 - 2500 159
Joined
·
898 Posts
Discussion Starter · #269 ·
Water tank drain. Hose valve with swivel fitting found in irrigation section:
73836


Vent. Used Flair-It and PEX, just went up a bit over a foot.
73837
 

·
Registered
2017 - 2500 159
Joined
·
898 Posts
Discussion Starter · #270 ·
I bought a heat gun to install the heat shrink hose clamps that came with my Isotemp water heater. Since I have my inverter in the van I'm able to use it. Comes in VERY handy for softening up the PEX pipe for the fittings. Worth buying just for that. Recommended tool, even if never used again after the build. Only cost 20 or 30 bucks.
 

·
Registered
2017 - 2500 159
Joined
·
898 Posts
Discussion Starter · #271 ·
And question time! Where to put the propane alarm? Is it ok to put it in the cabinet? Thinking either below the under sink cabinet, in with the Propex. This is where all the gas fittings are. Other idea is in the under sink cabinet, around 2 ft above the floor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
Water tank drain. Hose valve with swivel fitting found in irrigation section:
View attachment 73836
You may want to put a garden hose cap on that fitting. It doesn't have to perfectly seal, but right now you are a 1/4 turn away from your tank rapidly emptying onto your floor. A cap stops that or dials it back to just a drip. It also depends on where the valve is, if it's not somewhere that can be bumped then okay.
 

·
Registered
Van #2 2021 EXT
Joined
·
2,838 Posts
And question time! Where to put the propane alarm? Is it ok to put it in the cabinet? Thinking either below the under sink cabinet, in with the Propex. This is where all the gas fittings are. Other idea is in the under sink cabinet, around 2 ft above the floor.
Propane is heavier then air - so the lower the better IMO;

Closest to the most fittings & so you can easily access.
 

·
Premium Member
2018 136 HR Ont.
Joined
·
592 Posts
And question time! Where to put the propane alarm? Is it ok to put it in the cabinet? Thinking either below the under sink cabinet, in with the Propex. This is where all the gas fittings are. Other idea is in the under sink cabinet, around 2 ft above the floor.
You might want to locate it near your sleeping area so it monitors the air you breathe while you sleep.
 

·
Registered
2017 - 2500 159
Joined
·
898 Posts
Discussion Starter · #275 ·
Thinking about overhead cabinets. Plan to use Blum Aventos HK-S, mainly because they seem easier to install and align than hinges + gas strut. Got a few questions:

1) What's the ideal door & cabinet width? I don't yet know what we will want to put up there. I could do (2) 3 ft doors/cabinets, or (3) 2 ft doors/cabinets. Obviously more cabinets means more hardware, less total space, a bit more work, and no ability to store anything more than 3 ft long. On the other hand, I can't imagine having anything that long up there anyway, and smaller might be easier to organize and keep stuff from shuffling around. Also, smaller may look better with plain rectangle doors, while longer may look odd unless I try and get fancy with framed doors. Or, I could do 2 doors and a center divider in each one, making 4 cubbies.

2) I am debating a small shelf over the sliding door. The downside is a bit more of a low spot at the door, but it's only barely lower than my head and not really a good standing spot anyway. The plus side is a cleaner look, better support for adjacent cabinets over the sink, and a straight run for an LED strip at the ceiling/cabinet interface.
73885
 

·
Registered
2017 - 2500 159
Joined
·
898 Posts
Discussion Starter · #276 ·
You may want to put a garden hose cap on that fitting. It doesn't have to perfectly seal, but right now you are a 1/4 turn away from your tank rapidly emptying onto your floor. A cap stops that or dials it back to just a drip. It also depends on where the valve is, if it's not somewhere that can be bumped then okay.
I aimed the valve lever downward so it can't be bumped, but now it's better.
73917


Cut and drilled and sanded the sink counter. That teak is VERY hard, and very hard to drill and cut. Took a good half hour to cut out the sink hole, after an hour of careful measuring and marking. The faucet hole took 10 minutes to drill with a brand new hole saw, including several breaks to let the saw cool down. Did a slight positive reveal for the sink so I can use the cutout as a sink cover.
73918
 

·
Registered
2017 - 2500 159
Joined
·
898 Posts
Discussion Starter · #277 ·
Hooked up water filter and faucets, installed undermount sink.

Sanded the wood, eased the corners, and applied a couple coats of hardwax oil. Really gotta rub it in good to make sure it doesn't sit on the surface.

Mounting the undermount sink was a PAIN. I meant to buy clear silicone and accidentally bought white. The top lip of the hammered stainless steel sink wasn't perfectly straight, so there were pretty big gaps. Had to clamp each front corner, and shim up a bunch of wood under each back corner to squeeze it tight.

Added a dab of polyurethane adhesive in the rear corners for a solid hold. The front of the sink sits on the cabinet frame. Also added a couple clips near the back for good measure.

The silicone oozed out, and I added some to keep water out of the crack. It took almost an entire roll of paper towels to wipe off the excess, but I think after an hour of struggle it will be alright.

Took a lot of planning to figure out what order to do things. Had to get the counter clips installed on the counter, and predrilled in the cabinet so I can squeeze in a hand tool to screw it in.

Clamping the sink:
73949


Close up of the wood and faucets:
73950


Water filter mount, cabinet brackets, counter brackets, sink clip. Sink is stainless and clip is zinc/carbon, so wrapped it in tape to prevent corrosion:
73951


Supply lines:
73952
 

·
Registered
2017 - 2500 159
Joined
·
898 Posts
Discussion Starter · #278 ·
Eff this lousy silicone caulk.

Waited 24 hours for the silicone to cure on the sink, removed clamps, and the entire perimeter just pulled off instantly as everything relaxed. Removed the sink, peeled off the silicone, which came off as easy as masking tape.

Different approach. Instead of rear clips, I drilled holes and screwed the sink on with stainless steel screws, and lexel clear sealant around the perimeter. No clamps to remove and break seal. Clear lexel looks better than white caulk, and can get wet instantly (1 to 2 weeks for full cure).

Finally running water!

I also built trash bag clamps in the trash drawer. Bent a 1/4" rod into 2 squares, one for the back bag and one for the front bag. Fastened each with a spring on each side bolted into the side of the drawer with T nuts. The trash bags wrap around and clamp to the drawer.

Running water!! The filtered actually tastes quite different, to my surprise. I never drink filtered water unless I'm backpacking. The tank is filled with an inline Camco 20 micron filter. The drinking water faucet is supplied by a 0.5 micron block carbon filter.
73972


Looking good:
73973


The sink came with a manual saying fruit acids, toothpaste, and wine will void the supposed "warranty". Will this hole void the warranty?? 😂
73974


Trash bag clamps rings:
73975


Trash and recycling bags secured in drawers:
73976


How it works:
73977


Van shot:
73978


Under the sink:
73979
 
261 - 280 of 293 Posts
Top