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Anyone out there doing any winter camping with a high roof 159" that's 6'1 or taller? I'm worried about insulation and ceiling standing height. If we go with a promaster I'll likely install a espar B4 (gasser). With 1" polyiso in the ceiling, and 3/4" flooring with minimal insulation how uncomfortable is 0*F going to be? I talked to a guy with a transit and he said he can keep it in the mid 50's with the heater on low down to -5.
Initially we were going to get a transit and put 2" in the ceiling with an inch on the floor but I *realllly* want FWD for the winter. The price of the PM vs the ford is also very attractive.

Where are the tall people at? I need to be able to stand up straight for the money invested.
 

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You can do 1/2” polyiso under 1/2” plywood for the floor and then put 1” in the ceiling and be very comfortable down to 32º with the heater running on LOW! That’s what I have in my 136 HT. I expect to go to -5º will take all the heater can give. Fill the ribs with Thinsulate from Hein a poster here and that will help too. We have a curtain to close off the cab when it is cold or we need privacy and it is surprising how much that helps the insulation as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You can do 1/2” polyiso under 1/2” plywood for the floor and then put 1” in the ceiling and be very comfortable down to 32º with the heater running on LOW! That’s what I have in my 136 HT. I expect to go to -5º will take all the heater can give. Fill the ribs with Thinsulate from Hein a poster here and that will help too. We have a curtain to close off the cab when it is cold or we need privacy and it is surprising how much that helps the insulation as well.
Thanks, that's what I was thinking. 1/2" between the floor ridges or above you think? I'm not familiar with the ridgelines in the PM.

If I could get a 1/2" between ridges and a full sheet of 1/2" above I could probably even get away with 3/8" ply
 

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YMMV

While my wife and i are doing similar insulation tactics to many on this forum (thinsulate + +) over the years we have found that even the best insulated RV is still just a rolling metal tent of sorts... so we focus our attention on keeping the body warm by way of such things as Selk' Bag, "Mobile Mummy" bags, down booties etc... It is a whole lot more economical and easier IMO to get a person warm than the air around the person...

: ) Thom
 

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2014, 138WB, High Roof, Gas, SW MT
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Hi,
We have a 136 high roof van.

It has 1 inch urethane foam insulation in walls and ceiling and 1 inch polyiso on floor. The windows are single glazed and insulated with Reflectex panels.

We took a trip to Banff last winter and tracked heating fuel usage:
http://www.buildagreenrv.com/trip-reports-experiences-and-lessons/banff-trip/

Our furnace is propane with 12000 btu input and 9400 btu output. At 22 F outside temperature with about 60F inside temperature, the furnace was running half the time. For 0F outside, the demand would be about (60F - 0F) / (60F - 22F) = 1.6 times greater, so our 9400 BTU/hr output furnace would have been running almost full time to keep the interior at 60F.
You can compare that to the Espar for whatever its heat output is. The 159 van will require a bit more heat than our 136.

I think for routine operation at 0F, you would want more insulation than our 1 inch polyiso eqivalent equivalent.

Upping wall insultion to 2 inches of polyiso while leaving floor and ceiling at 1 inch for headroom would help. Good window insulation also helps.

Gary
 

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MMXVI - L2H2 in IN
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and shrinking the volume to be heated.
 

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If you have windows, a major source of heat loss is through them. What works great and still allows for light is to use a window insulator kit for the windows. It essentially makes the windows double pane and dramatically reduces heat loss. Also, as mentioned above, keeping your feet and head warm makes a huge difference in comfort level. Certainly insulating to the greatest reasonable levels helps too.
 

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Pretty much what RD & Gary said. 1" rigid foam between roof ribs-this is slightly thicker than depth of rib; attach 1/8" ceiling panel to ribs.
1/4" ccf or plywood between floor ribs to make floor flat; 1/2" rigid foam over that; then 1/2" plywood or = for solid layer; lay cheap carpet runners where u walk is a big +. That leaves headroom if u are 6-1. I also put 1.5" rigid foam on floor under cabinets and bed where headroom doesn't matter. Put all u can in walls & get insulated window panels. Thats about all u can do & keep headroom. If you need a 50F degree delta may need to idle-heat before sleep and first thing in am-no big deal for engine. Also, running furnace all night may tax a 200ah battery system. That combined with B4 should give a comfy nites sleep. Certainly will keep everything well above freezing. I've not heard of B4 gasser; expect it's super pricy. Don't know if Webasto has higher output gas heater. If u need more than that you'd prob need to get a propane furnace.
 

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No need to fill the floor ribs. The polyiso will not crush into them once the plywood is down and filling them will not change the insulation value enough to matter.. 1/2 inch plywood is the practical limit for thinness and buy the best grade. The diesel Espar D2 is 8,000 BTU for reference.

Go to GaryBIS’s insulation calculator for a better idea of how to get what you need.
https://www.builditsolar.com/References/Calculators/VanHeatLoss/VanHeatLoss.htm

We insulate ourselves once we get into bed @ 9-10 and then turn the Espar on @ 6 am before we get up, on nights when the temps are down to ~32º, below that we run the heater. BTW a good foam 5” mattress (IKEA) does the insulating below and our Kelty fill sized sleeping bag opened for a comforter above.
 

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Please pardon the Noob question (my build is still a few years in the future). I am also over 6'1" and have no desire to emulate Quasimodo; so insulation of the floor and ceiling will be the bare minimum (fill between the roof ribs, add Thinsulate inside the ribs, thinnest floor possible, etc.). Has anyone thought about using two Espar units to double the BTU capabilities of the system? In the gasser, the available fuel-tap is designed (so I have read here) to leave enough reserve fuel to start the engine and get you a reasonable distance to obtain more fuel, so fuel is probably not the issue, right? A second intake/exhaust duct would have to be accommodated, but that shouldn't be insurmountable.

Is this feasible?
 

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There is a larger capacity Espar heater. Buy that instead. In diesel it is called the Airtronic D4- 13,650 BTU. These use so little fuel a few nights will not even show up as reduced mpg!
 
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